RANT: Let them eat cake!

Sunday, May 31, 2009

http://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2009/05/the_most_expensive_date_night.html

May 31, 2009
The Most Expensive Date Night in History
Rick Moran

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Thirdly, with GM set to declare bankruptcy next week and American families trying and, in many cases, failing to make ends meet in these hard economic times, shouldn’t the president be a little more circumspect in his private affairs?

*** end quote ***

Argh!

How out of of touch the rich (DEMOCRATIC) elite are!

Don’t get me wrong — both parties suck.

At least, the R’s don’t pretend to be in touch. The D’s are supposedly the party of the “little people”. Yeah, right!

Sorry, but this had to cost us taxpayers a fortune and it’s irritating.

Guess we should be happy it wasn’t a date in Paris!

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UPDATE: Guestimates as high as 250k$ of taxpayer $

http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2009/jun/01/curl-cost-nyc-weekend/

*** begin quote ***

One thing is known — The Obamas picked up the cost of dinner costs and their orchestra seat tickets, which cost $96.50 a piece. So if the whole thing cost $250,000, the Obamas offset that by at least a few hundred bucks. Phew.

*** end quote ***

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MONEY: Calculating the impact of taxes

Sunday, May 31, 2009

http://ludwig-1.newsvine.com/_news/2009/05/21/2847441-time-for-revolution?email=html

Time for Revolution!
News Type: Event — Thu May 21, 2009 11:58 AM EDT
politics, government, taxes, liberal, freedom, liberty, revolution, libertarian, jefferson, roosevelt, conservitive, authoritarian
Ludwigc

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We need a revolution in this country. Not of violence, but a purging of what our apathy has created.

*** and ***

I work hard for my money. I’m self employed and in this economy I work harder than ever. After all that struggle and hard work I lose over 50% of my total income to the government per year. That is completely unacceptable.   

*** end quote ***

May I point out two things that make the definition or calculation of “taxes” harder:

(1) Corporate taxes are passed along for real people to pay. So when I pick up a can of something in the store, it’s IMPOSSIBLE for me to know how much tax I am paying. And, it’s like looking at a mirror with a mirror behind you. The progression is infinite. The can was taxed. The delivery was taxed. The production equipment is taxed. It’s an accounting nightmare.

(2) The money is no longer a “standard of account”. A 1970 dollar is “different” than a 2010 dollar. In purchasing power. It’s inflation by the Federal Reserve. And, it is the “hidden tax” on dollars. It too is difficult to calculate. If you think in terms of dollars, it’s like doing carpentry where this year’s inch is different than last year’s inch. It’s inconceivable. The definition morphs with time. And, it’s deceptive in that it impacts any dollar denominated asset. This means that you can actually pay more than 100% of your income in tax. Have a half million in assets and inflation is 5%, then you are paying a 25k$ in tax. And, how do you calculate inflation. The FED and the gooferment fudge the numbers.

So, we are slaves. We can’t even guesstimate how much we are paying taxes!

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TECHNOLOGY: Record keeping for the psuedo hypochondriac?

Sunday, May 31, 2009

[DIsclaimer: I’m neither a doctor or a lawyer. Nor do I play one on TV! Nothing here should be construed as legal, medical, or investment advice. For that, you should seek out the appropriate certified credentialed and licensed professional. Advice given here is in the nature of entertainment and should be relied on. In the event of an emergency, hag up and dial 911.]

Ahh, as many of the readers know, I am now a full time “patient advocate”. Courtesy of the crappy economy, age discrimination, and the luxury of several lucrative “retirements”! But this isn’t about me. I’ve come to a realization as we parade from doctor to doctor and from test to test.

The medical profession is disorganized from a patient perspective.

Between the gooferment rules, the insurance companies, and drug stores, it’s a miracle that anyone survives.

Having gotten my medical degree from Doctor Phil, akin to my law degree from Judge Judy, with advanced training at Doctor House’s school of charm, the show that highlights the Bronx’s saint barnabas’ Emergency Department (Guess NBC has made the nomenclature “ER” to baggage laden) and Mystery Diagnosis. (My application to watch Doctor G Medical Examiner is pending. THat maybe a skill I don’t need in my “P(i)A” role.

Having established my bona fides, I wish to point out that every patient needs to keep records. In the case of children, parents need to do it for them. In the case of seniors, some one better do it for them. (I don’t see how old folks who aren’t sharp survive in today’s medical environment.) And, in the case of everyone else, you best have an organized approach to “record keeping” for your own sanity.

Now, I’d suggest that you FORGET Google Health, any other technology solution, and (Heaven Help Us) any gooferment record keeping solution.

(The biggest wet my pants laffer was the recent “health care summit” where President Obama met with a bunch of executives and came out saying was how electronic records will save grazillions. Since he said it with a straight face, I guess he believed it. It works so well in the VA! Guess MSNBC will be reporting it, GE will be selling it, and the gooferment will be bailing it out. Argh!)

Seriously, now.

You need a bound BOOK. In it you keep a contemporaneous holographic chronological record of everything.

(Regularly-maintained business records are admissible in evidence as an exception to the hearsay rule. And, you’re seeking to create a combination of trustworthiness and necessity. Have to hear from Judge Judy, if she’d find that admissible in her court. Wonder how you contact her for a ruling? And, yes, when you want to sue some particular sob, you’ll have a starting point. Waste of time to sue unless they kill a youngster, but that’s another post!)

The bound book should be a chronology of your trek thru the medical care system. (System implies a degree of design; it’s a misnomer.)

At every instance, you should use an appropriate word processor to capture your CHRONOLOGY in an easily usable form.

(I use a table format with: day, date, time, doc, note, follow up, and eot. EOT is jargon for “end of task”. You can check off that column when you’ve completed that entry. Makes it easy to scan what’s left to be done.)

You should, using that same word processor, create a doctor ROSTER where you capture the name, address, phone, fax, and pager number for every doctor, lab, or pharmacy you use. When you change a player on your team, after you make a note in your BOOK, you need to update the roster and even create a “your fired” and a “your hired” letter. (Nice to let these people know that they are not God and you’re the Devil Incarnate.)

You should, using that same word processor, create a DRUG SUMMARIZATION. On that you want to capture, who RXed what and why. (Why is VERY important when another esteemed member of the medical community asks you why you are taking something and who prescribed it.) I suggest a table: RX#, Drug (Trade and Chemical) Name, Dose, When Started, When Stopped, Who RXed it, and Why. You should keep a perpetual summarization and recent summarization. Entries can roll oft the recent summarization after being stopped a quarter. Everything is kept on the perpetual record. (I like the ambulance chaser commercials. You know: “Have you or any member of your family ever been hurt by taking AWHATYOUCALLIT? Call 1800shyster for a free consultation.” That’s why you have a perpetual summarization. Maybe a database.)

(Interesting aside. It really easy to get “instructions” from individuals. Especially in hospital situations. My “new” rule is I want a business card from every doctor giving medical advice. For my BOOK. It’s real easy to get “verbals”. It may even be on paper. But, it was transcribed by a busy nurse listening to a distracted doc. If it’s important enough for my Patient to take or do, then it’s important enough for a doc to take the time to tell us. I have a litany of medication errors, mistakes, and misunderstandings to back that up.)

In dealing with labs, you must insist that every test copies you. You will save yourself a lot of time and aggravation my keeping your own file of lab reports. (LABS) As part of your book, you should record the testing and refer to the document. By some reference.

(Interesting aside. If you have a lab report, or a copy of a lab report, how do you KNOW that it wasn’t been altered. How do you prove that any document hasn’t been altered. Crypto checksum?)

If you set up your CHRONOLOGY document correctly, you can extract a doctor specific chronology.

I’d suggest you start today, before things become critical and you have to scramble.

Besides who knows when they were vaccinated for measles?

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POLITICAL: Teen Age Driver’s decals are age-ism!

Saturday, May 30, 2009

http://www.mycentraljersey.com/article/20090531/OPINION02/905310313/-1/STOCK01

Decals for teen drivers bit silly, don’t you think?
May 31, 2009

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There has been a great deal of debate about the efficacy of placing decals on the vehicles of drivers under the age of 21. Apparently the reason is that other drivers will know that vehicle is being driven by a young driver and, as a response, alter their own behavior. Otherwise, what is the point? A plausible argument can be made that this legislation does not go far enough. It should be implemented worldwide for American citizens.

Many of our Bradley fighting vehicles and Humvees patrolling the streets of Mosul and Abu Hishma in Iraq are being driven by young soldiers. How many Abrahms tanks are being driven in the mountains of Afghanistan by Marines under the age of 21? Here in New Jersey we know these men and women are not smart enough, as my mother always says, to come in out of the rain. After a combat tour or two, they can come home to New Jersey and buy a soda and talk with their friends down at the local teen social center about buddies who lost limbs or were killed in combat. On the other hand they are not mature enough to vote, purchase alcoholic beverages or buy a pack cigarettes.

As for driving a car, they are not to be trusted. Navigating the mean streets of Manville or Raritan is far more dangerous and complicated than driving through a combat zone in Iraq or Afghanistan with an insurgent sniper drawing a bead on your left eye.

As a country that prides itself on truth and fair play, don’t we owe it to the Taliban and al-Qaida to let them know when a Humvee they are about to blow up with a roadside bomb is being driven by a person under the age of 21? When the insurgents are planning an ambush, they need to know if the soldiers are under 21 so they can be careful.

Sometimes those kids drive a little too fast and that throws the timing of their IEDs off. Not fair play.

What we need is an ad hoc coalition of concerned citizen volunteers from New Jersey to go into combat zones and affix decals to vehicles being driven by American GIs under the age of 21. Any takers?

AMBROSE J. NELSON
South Amboy

*** end quote ***

Yes! I think we should round up all the Trenton Politicians who voted for this non-sense and ship them to AfPak for “labeling” duty.

I’ll go one step further.

As a little L libertarian, I think we need to eliminate ALL drug, licensing, and most of the other “laws”.

If you’re not ready to go that far, see if you’ll take this FIRST step.

We “ask” children to go fight for us. Whatever age we “allow” someone to go get killed “for us”, then they have the RIGHT as a full citizen. Period! No restrictions.

If you agree with that first step, how about this SECOND step.

Our culture doesn’t teach youngsters to drink alcohol responsibly. So let’s take the age restriction off completely. Let’s encourage experimentation and education, long before they get to college. There they kill themselves drinking with their new found freedom.

If you agree with that second step, how about trying a THIRD step.

The pseudo “Drug War”is killing children is so many ways. Drug overdoses are a direct result of impure mislabeled and / or adulterated products. They are “products”. Just because they are “illegal” doesn’t take them off the market to children. Most will agree that MJ is MORE available than beer. Our prisons are filled with non-violent drug offenders. The addiction rate is far above the “natural addiction” rate. So, let’s get real here. The DEA is a total failure. They say insanity is “doing more of the same and expecting different results”. Lets admit defeat in the drug war. From Afgan to Columbia, a bunch of bad guys are profiting from our stupidity. And the children are the casualties in this war. It’s estimate that if “drugs” were not illegal, the cost of “drugs” would be comparable to aspirin. So let’s turn loose our “secret weapon” on the Drug Lords and Gangs … … WalMart! If drugs were a legal product, they’d take care of the problem. We’d turn prisoners into patients.

Laws aren’t the answer; common sense and liberty is the only workable answer.

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LIBERTY: “Too big to fail” is a gooferment failure

Saturday, May 30, 2009

http://www.openleft.com/showDiary.do?diaryId=12177

Break Up These Banks
by: Mike Lux
Thu Mar 12, 2009 at 17:00

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I also fundamentally agree with David Sirota that if these corporations are too big to fail, then they are too big to exist: a proposition also agreed to by the populists and progressives of the late 1800s/early 1900s, by Abe Lincoln, by Teddy Roosevelt, by FDR, by Harry Truman. Progressives of all eras have understood that corporations that grow too enormous threaten our economy and our democracy, and should be woken up into smaller entities that can’t do so much damage when they are mismanaged. The era of bank consolidation has to come to an end, and these monsters need to be broken into smaller companies just like Standard Oil was in the early 1900s.

*** end quote ***

Very good point.

“To big to fail, then they are too big”

It would seem that’s a great principle of regulation!

Wonder why none of the “brains” ever thought of it?

Could it be that the politicians need things big to get political contributions?

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TECHNOLOGY: Microsoft slips a “vulnerability” into Firefox

Saturday, May 30, 2009

http://voices.washingtonpost.com/securityfix/2009/05/microsoft_update_quietly_insta.html

*** begin quote ***

When I first learned of this, three thoughts immediately flashed through my mind:

1) How the %#@! did I miss this?

2) The right way would have been to just publish the add-on at Mozilla’s Add Ons page.

3) This kind of makes you wonder what else MS is installing without your knowledge.

Then I found that I wasn’t the only one who had these ideas. Microsoft has heard these criticisms from others who long ago commented on this unfortunate development (see the comments underneath this post).

Anyway, I’m sure it’s not the end of the world, but it’s probably infuriating to many readers nonetheless. Firstly — to my readers — I apologize for overlooking this…”feature” of the .NET Framework security update. Secondly — to Microsoft — this is a great example of how not to convince people to trust your security updates.

By Brian Krebs | May 29, 2009; 7:40 AM ET

*** end quote ***

One reason that I have left the Microsoft “flock” is their continued insistence on “secret hidden updates”. It similar to the problem of “cloud computing” in that your “production quality” software changes under your very nose!

The other huge reason is WGA aka as “You Pirate; You Screwed”. (I’ve had more legitimate copies of XP “nuked” by WGA after all sorts of trivial events!)

Linux everywhere anyone?

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RANT: The goofment punishes taxpayers?

Saturday, May 30, 2009

http://www.lifenews.com/state4165.html

Louisiana Nurse Wins State Supreme Court Battle in Plan B Conscience Case
by Steven Ertelt LifeNews.com Editor
May 20, 2009

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Baton Rouge, LA (LifeNews.com) — A Louisiana nurse won her battle at the state Supreme Court last Friday when it refused to hear a hospital’s appeal of a lower court decision siding with her. The nurse, Toni Lemly, sued St. Tammany Parish Hospital in 2005 after it refused to grant a reasonable accommodation for her religious beliefs.

*** end quote ***

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See this is where it gets confusing to me.

The hospital is the gooferment for all intents and purposes.

The Constitution says we have religious freedom.

So now we taxpayers have to pay for when the gooferment doesn’t follow its own rules.

And, exactly how does this punish anyone but the taxpayer?

Can I get off this delusional merry go round? It’s making me sick.

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