INTERESTING: Why are some “invincible”?

https://nypost.com/2022/01/13/these-invincibles-want-to-know-why-theyve-never-had-covid/

These ‘invincibles’ have never had COVID — and they want to know why
By Alyson Krueger
January 13, 2022 6:34am  Updated

*** begin quote ***

As COVID cases explode across the US with 62.8 million total reported since 2020, and almost eight million since Jan. 1, 2022 — and even fully vaccinated people reporting breakthrough cases — it seems as if almost no one has been left untouched by the Sars-Cov-2 virus. But like McMullin, there are some who have failed to contract COVID during the entire pandemic, even as Omicron spreads like wildfire.

*** end quote ***

Why aren’t we hearing more about these people — what do they eat, what shape are they in, where do they “fit” chemically?

I’ve been convinced for a long time that the “experts” don’t know squat about this.

And the Gooferment politicians and bureaucrats know even less.

One thing is for sure, I KNOW that they don’t have MY best interests at heart.

Argh!

—30—

INTERESTING: Mama dolphin smack the leader of a human diving group?

https://www.futilitycloset.com/2021/11/23/lodging-a-complaint/

Among the most compelling anecdotes suggesting that dolphins have concepts of ‘wrong’ behavior is Thomas White’s description of how a human snorkeler observing Atlantic spotted dolphins off the Bahamas went outside the bounds of the norms of behavior expected by the dolphins of human observers at that site. The swimmer approached a calf engaged in learning to fish with its mother, a no-no in the rules of engagement between swimmers and these dolphins built up over years. When this happened, the mother then swam not to the hapless trespasser but to the leader of the group of swimmers, whom she could identify, and tail-slapped, her displeasure apparently directed at the leader who had not controlled the behavior of those being led.

— Hal Whitehead and Luke Rendell, The Cultural Lives of Whales and Dolphins, 2015

# – # – # – # – #

Fascinating!

Speechless.

Nearly human?  Maybe better than human.  The was some humans act in traffic, for sure.

—30—

INTERESTING: Who discovered the Pythagorean theorem first?

https://www.futilitycloset.com/2021/11/02/tilt-3/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+FutilityCloset+%28Futility+Closet%29

Tilt

*** begin quote ***

As early as the 1st century B.C., the Chinese text Zhou Bi Suan Jing reflected the reasoning of the Pythagorean theorem, showing how to find the hypotenuse of the 3-4-5 triangle. 

*** and ***

In Mathematics and the Aesthetic (2007), Nathalie Sinclair writes, “The Chinese diagram … is the same as one given by the twelfth-century Indian scholar Bhaskara, whose one-word injunction Behold! recorded his sense of awe.”

*** end quote ***

Hey, we was taught it’s the Pythagorean formula.  But it seems that some Babylonians may have preceded the Greeks and Indians (from India).  Maybe the Chinese found it first?

—30—

INTERESTING: Are humans like these Deer In The Czech Republic Have Migration Patterns Guided By Memories Of?

https://www.mindbounce.com/trivia/deer-in-the-czech-republic-have-migration-patterns-guided-by-memories-of/

TRIVIA
Deer In The Czech Republic Have Migration Patterns Guided By Memories Of?
Fault Lines
Medieval Trade Routes
The Iron Curtain
Abandoned Logging Roads
Cuchulainn/Wikimedia

*** begin quote ***

Answer: The Iron Curtain

Researchers tracking the movement of red deer in the Czech Republic discovered something rather curious. Despite the physical ability to travel freely wherever they wished, the deer’s travel routes never crossed the border between the Czech Republic and Germany.

The deer have no political motivation in avoiding international travel, but instead are obeying what amounts to a set of rules passed down, generationally, from doe to fawn. During the Cold War, the entire border between the Czech Republic and West Germany was fenced off with parallel electrified fences and patrolled by armed guards. Crossing the border was a death sentence for the deer and they learned to avoid the entire length of it.

Young red deer spend roughly a year with their mother after birth and it turns out that red deer mothers have, for generations now, been teaching their young to avoid the border. At this point, they could easily cross the border without worry, but the habit is ingrained and although the deer can’t communicate why the area is dangerous to each other, they learn by behavior and avoid it for the rest of their lives—passing the border avoidance on to their offspring.

*** end quote ***

Rule of thumb

How many ingrained habits do we humans have?  Lessons aka “rules of thumb” called, in fancy language heuristics, can lead us astray when they no longer apply (i.e., the universe change making them erroneous, obsolete, or if we are lucky just a quaint oddity. We get them from our ancestors or other human beings.

A heuristic is a mental shortcut that allows an individual to make a decision, pass judgment, or solve a problem quickly and with minimal mental effort. While heuristics can reduce the burden of decision-making and free up limited cognitive resources, they can also be costly when they lead individuals to miss critical information or act on unjust biases.

Sometimes, it can be quaint when one of those “rules” is observed in the real world that just makes no sense (i.e., “the man should walk on the left side of a woman” so should he need to draw his sword she’d be safe).  But other times, to just dangerous to ignore (i.e., the safe following distance when driving).

In any event, this story reminds me about how they train elephants to be bound by a thin leg rope.  The elephant is conditioned that they can not escape.

How many limiting beliefs do we have?

How many do I have?

What can’t be seen?

—30—

INTERESTING: Donate Your Body to Science

https://www.mentalfloss.com/article/557341/donating-your-body-science?utm_source=pocket_mylist

Everything You’ve Ever Wanted to Know About Donating Your Body to Science
BY EMILY PETSKO — MAY 31, 2019

*** begin quote ***

“I’d much rather be used for medical research than be buried,” Poulakos, 64, tells Mental Floss. “We’re not going to be using our bodies anymore anyway, so they might as well use it for whatever they need.”

*** and ***

These deceased donors help to save lives. Medical students dissect cadavers to learn about anatomy. Researchers use them to study diseases like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s. Surgeons use corpses to refine new procedures like face transplants. And cadavers have even aided the advancement of surgical robots.

Yet corpses can be hard to come by: An estimated 20,000 Americans donate their bodies to science each year, which equates to less than 1 percent of the 2.7 million Americans who die annually. Put simply, the demand is far greater than the supply.

*** end quote ***

I feel the same way.  I’ve instructed my primary survivor (i.e., POS, HAP, AD) when she pulls the plug to do this but she thinks it “gross”. I hope she will.

It seems such a waste to bury spare parts.  And, if it can’t be used for parts, at least let the med students practice.

If I can’t do anything else right for humanity, I can do this.

—30—

INTERESTING: Here’s a crazy behavior

r/todayilearned 
•Posted byu/YourOwnBiggestFan 
15 hours ago
 

TIL of William Lyttle, the “Mole Man of Hackney”, who spent around 40 years digging a network of tunnels up to 59 feet (18 m) long beneath his home. When the authorities discovered the extent of his burrowing, he was rehoused on the top floor of a high-rise to prevent digging.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/W…

# – # – # – # – #

That’s strange behavior!

—30—

INTERESTING: Merck, the company that invented ivermectin, doesn’t want an off-patent drug

https://anti-empire.com/indication-ivermectin-drastically-reduces-deaths-keeps-trickling-in-from-the-third-world-too-bad-its-a-cheap-generic/

Indication Ivermectin Drastically Reduces Deaths Keeps Trickling in From the Third World. Too Bad It’s a Cheap Generic
Would rain on the virus cult parade
Dr. Sebastian Rushworth

*** begin quote ***

Back in January I wrote an article about four randomized controlled trials of ivermectin as a treatment for covid-19 that had at that time released their results to the public. Each of those four trials had promising results, but each was also too small individually to show any meaningful impact on the hard outcomes we really care about, like death. When I meta-analyzed them together however, the results suddenly appeared very impressive. Here’s what that meta-analysis looked like:

It showed a massive 78% reduction in mortality in patients treated with covid-19. Mortality is the hardest of hard end points, which means it’s the hardest for researchers to manipulate and therefore the least open to bias. Either someone’s dead, or they’re alive. End of story.

You would have thought that this strong overall signal of benefit in the midst of a pandemic would have mobilized the powers that be to arrange multiple large randomized trials to confirm these results as quickly as possible, and that the major medical journals would be falling over each other to be the first to publish these studies.

That hasn’t happened.

*** and ***

I understand why pharmaceutical companies don’t like ivermectin. It’s a cheap generic drug.

Even Merck, the company that invented ivermectin, is doing it’s best to destroy the drug’s reputation at the moment. This can only be explained by the fact that Merck is currently developing two expensive new covid drugs, and doesn’t want an off-patent drug, which it can no longer make any profit from, competing with them.

The only reason I can think to understand why the broader medical establishment, however, is still so anti-ivermectin is that these studies have all been done outside the rich west. Apparently doctors and scientists outside North America and Western Europe can’t be trusted, unless they’re saying things that are in line with our pre-conceived notions.

*** end quote ***

Follow the money!

Just like DJT45 said!

—30—

INTERESTING: New Zealand trying to eradicate hedgehog ‘killing machines’

https://nypost.com/2021/05/08/new-zealand-trying-to-eradicate-hedgehog-killing-machines/

New Zealand trying to eradicate hedgehog ‘killing machines’
By Paula Froelich

*** begin quote ***

New Zealand is now trying to eradicate the animals by 2050, by way of trapping, hunting, and poisoning them — a plan that is despised by some locals due to the “cuteness” of the animals.

Foster told the Guardian there is “a bit of a psychological barrier” when it comes to hedgehog eradication. “It has been proposed to ship them all back to the UK. European hedgehogs aren’t doing so well in Europe. Still in good numbers, but they are declining.”

*** end quote ***

Not that easy to undo the mistakes of the past?

—30—

INTERESTING: “Pickup Trucks” are a metaphor for liberty

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2021-03-11/the-dangerous-rise-of-the-supersized-pickup-truck

*** begin quote ***

• What Happened to Pickup Trucks? Why have pickup trucks morphed into such huge, angry, and dangerous presences? Traffic safety experts, commentators on U.S. automotive culture, and social scientists have suggested a range of forces behind truck bloat. As U.S. drivers buy more full-size and heavy-duty pickups, these vehicles have transformed from no-frills workhorses into angry giants. They are more than just a polarizing consumer choice: Large pickups and SUVs are notably more lethal to other road users, and their conquest of U.S. roads has been accompanied by a spike in fatalities among pedestrians and bicyclists. (CityLab)

*** end quote ***

The Gooferment made cars into toys (i.e., all the same and no power to get out of their own way).

And pickup trucks are “macho” or at least an anti-Gooferment statement.

Eventually it will become a “bone of contention”.

—30—

INTERESTING: Funny how some things leak; and some things don’t

FROM TWITTER

Sharyl Attkisson 
@SharylAttkisson
·
Mar 15
 
There seemed to be no dispute over the claim that Epstein videotaped, for blackmail purposes, his famous clients. More than a year and a half after his death, where are the tapes?

Funny how some things leak; and some things don’t.

# – # – # – # – #

I’m still waiting for an in-depth investigation of the whole débâcle!

—30—

INTERESTING: The City of Minneapolis settlement may have just denied Fair trial

https://redstate.com/shipwreckedcrew/2021/03/13/payout-of-27-million-to-family-of-george-floyd-could-derail-criminal-case-against-officer-derek-chauvin-n342875

Payout of $27 Million to Family of George Floyd Could Derail Criminal Case Against Officer Derek Chauvin
By Shipwreckedcrew | Mar 13, 2021 3:30 PM ET

*** begin quote ***

The injection into this process of a new factual wrinkle that the City of Minneapolis has decided to pay $27 million to George Floyd’s family in connection with what Derek Chauvin is accused to have done, only makes it more likely — in my view — that the final outcome will be that Chauvin cannot receive his Constitutionally mandated “fair trial” in Hennepin County.

*** end quote ***

Interesting reading.

Given how racial tensions are heightened, this settlement may have just guaranteed that there will be riots.

Sad to say, there will be no peace if it’s perceived as no justice.

What a mess.

But what do you expect when politicians and bureaucrats are involved.

—30—

INTERESTING: Radioactive dust returns to France?

https://www.euronews.com/amp/2021/03/01/irony-as-saharan-dust-returns-radiation-from-french-nuclear-tests-in-the-1960s?utm_term=Autofeed&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter&__twitter_impression=true

*** begin quote ***

Dust from the Sahara Desert blown north by strong seasonal winds to France did not only bring stunning light and sunsets – it also carried abnormal levels of radiation.

*** end quote ***

No idea if this is true or not!

But if it is, then it’s a great lesson in Karma or Unintended Consequences?

Wonder what the health consequences are?

—30—

INTERESTING: Do your own demonstration

Think masks are a good policy?

I was standing outside the daycare the other morning. It was cold. I was wearing my mask as they require. Standing close to the door to let them know we were there, I notice the door fogging up from my breath.

So if Covid spreads by your breath’s droplets, then masks don’t stop anything.

As @tomwoods says, masks are a religion.

—30—

INTERESTING: “Unwritten Rules”! What are they?

https://reason.com/2020/10/04/unassailable-ideas-how-unwritten-rules-and-social-media-shape-discourse-in-american-higher-education/

FREE SPEECH

“Unassailable Ideas: How Unwritten Rules and Social Media Shape Discourse in American Higher Education”
Profs. Ilana Redstone and John Villasenor are guest-blogging this week about their new book.
EUGENE VOLOKH |THE VOLOKH CONSPIRACY | 10.4.2020 12:40 PM

*** begin quote ***

Redstone and Villasenor further identify and explain how three well-intentioned unwritten rules regarding identity define the current campus climate. They present myriad case studies illustrating the resulting impact on education, knowledge creation-and, increasingly the world beyond campus. They also provide a set of recommendations to build a new campus climate that would be more tolerant toward diverse perspectives and open inquiry.

*** end quote ***

“multiculturalism, discrimination, and identity”

Isn’t “multiculturalism” merely a Gooferment fiction?  When I grew up I was “watched” by a variety of “family” members (i.e., neighbors) who were Irish, Italian, Jewish, Puerto Rican, and Black.  By Catholics, Protestants, Jews, Atheists, and Pagans.  By old and young.  And it just seemed normal.  Neighbors looking out for neighbors. “I know who you are and I know your Mother” were a frequent refrain. 

Isn’t discrimination an important skill?  One must discriminate between good and evil people.  Between things that are toxic and not.  Of course, we learned that “you can’t judge a book by its cover” applied to everyone and everything.

Isn’t “identity” another tool that Gooferment, politicians, and bureaucrats use to divide humanity into factions that they can pit against one another.  Life is NOT a zero sum game.  Don’t argue about dividing a fixed pie when together we can make the pie bigger.

Can’t wait to read this book and see if we align.

Argh!

—30—

INTERESTING: Does Disney deceive the consumer?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aladdin_(franchise)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aladdin_(1992_Disney_film)

Alexa “Play Aladdin Soundtrack”

# – # – # – # – #

This cause a lot of angst.  Daniel, to whom I’m “pop pop”, watch the original aladdin movie in the car.  As usual, he became enamored of the movie and wanted to hear the music out of the car.

No problem!

I fired up Alexa and ask for “Play Aladdin Soundtrack” and got Will Smith signing?

WTH!

No amount of rephrasing could get the sound that Daniel wanted.

It was until I was in Best Buy today that I found two DIFFERENT Aladin’s — both with the “original cast recording”.

Argh!

Disney cheats.

Maybe it’s a little thing, but I always trusted Disney and they let me down.

So sad!

—30—

INTERESTING: Thirsty squirrel BEGS child for water – and finishes off the bottle | Daily Mail Online

A parched squirrel polished off a bottle of water in one long gulp. In astonishing footage, the squirrel runs after a child and stands on its hind legs, stretching out its front paws to beg for the bottle.

Source: Thirsty squirrel BEGS child for water – and finishes off the bottle | Daily Mail Online

*** begin quote ***

A parched squirrel polished off a bottle of water in one long gulp. In astonishing footage, the squirrel runs after a child and stands on its hind legs, stretching out its front paws to beg for the bottle. It is not clear where the video was captured but the people in it sound American. One viewer on social media said of urban squirrels: ‘It only takes one person to offer them water from a bottle for them to know what a water bottle is.’

*** end quote ***

I know that they are just “rats”, but the intelligent adaption is fascinating.

—30—

INTERESTING: Is Political Change Coming To China?

Authored by Yuen Yuen Ang via Project Syndicate, In contemporary China, profound political transformation can – and has – taken place in the absence of regime change or Western-style democratization. The starkest example is the period of “reform and opening” that began in 1978 under Deng Xiaoping’s charge.

Source: Is Political Change Coming To China?

# – # – # – # – #

Can China survive?  The USSR was too big.  Probably the USA is too.

I don’t know enough to predict, but it certainly seems possible.

— 30 —

INTERESTING: Findings in human nature … (but not me. I hope?)

2019-Feb-13

https://aeon.co/ideas/the-bad-news-on-human-nature-in-10-findings-from-psychology?__s=12xy3otbpaqaeckpabvz

The bad news on human nature, in 10 findings from psychology

  • We view minorities and the vulnerable as less than human. 
  • We experience Schadenfreude (pleasure at another person’s distress)
  • We believe in karma 
  • We are blinkered and dogmatic. 
  • We would rather electrocute ourselves than spend time in our own thoughts. 
  • We are vain and overconfident. 
  • We are moral hypocrites. 
  • We are all potential trolls. 
  • We favour ineffective leaders with psychopathic traits. 
  • We are sexually attracted to people with dark personality traits. 

# – # – # – # – #

INTERESTING: Is “football” over?

2019-Jan-27

http://www.espn.com/espn/story/_/id/25776964/insurance-market-football-evaporating-causing-major-threat-nfl-pop-warner-colleges-espn

For the NFL and all of football, a new threat: an evaporating insurance market play 
Jan 17, 2019 Steve Fainaru Mark Fainaru-Wada

*** begin quote ***

“Basically, the world has left the marketplace,” Alex Fairly, CEO of the Fairly Group, an Amarillo, Texas-based risk management firm whose clients include the NFL and Major League Baseball, told Outside the Lines. “If you’re football, hockey or soccer, the insurance business doesn’t want you.”

During the November convention of the Casualty Actuarial Society in Las Vegas, William Primps, an insurance lawyer and former Yale running back, told hundreds of actuaries, “Overall, I think that there is a real threat to the viability of contact sports.”

*** end quote ***

I know, personally, that some are not going to let their children play football.  I think that is the “death blow”.  Here’s another factor in its eventual demise?

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INTERESTING: Johnny Appleseed was a businessman

https://www.howtogeek.com/trivia/johnny-appleseeds-goal-in-planting-apple-trees-was-to/

GEEK TRIVIA
Johnny Appleseed’s Goal In Planting Apple Trees Was To?

*** begin quote ***

One thing we’re willing to bet on, however, is that when you learned about Johnny Appleseed—a real historical figure actually named John Chapman—what you didn’t learn at the tender age of, say, 7, was that old Johnny was mad planting nurseries of trees across the land to be used for creating orchards of apples to make hard cider. If you’re surprised by that, we don’t blame you. The modern perception of John Chapman is of a fairy-tale like folklore hero who traipsed across the American landscape planting apple trees like a Disney princess spreading good will. In reality, Chapman was a practical man doing the most practical thing to feed early American’s ravenous appetite for hard cider—a drink that was, by far and away, one of the most popular beverages this side of the Atlantic ocean throughout the 1800s. People on the frontiers, where drinking water was often suspect, consumed an average of 11 ounces of hard cider per day.

*** end quote ***

I didn’t know that.   Amazing capitalism in disguise until the “book burners” of the “temperance movement” destroyed it.  Argh!

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INTERESTING: And segregation was designed in?

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/how-to-build-secret-nuclear-city

How the Manhattan Project’s Nuclear Suburb Stayed Secret
Oak Ridge, Tennessee, once home to 75,000, went up fast and under the radar. But it was built to last, too.
BY JESSICA LEIGH HESTER MAY 03, 2018

*** begin quote ***

At least for some. While white employees lived in relatively cushy digs, their black counterparts were more likely to be placed in structures known as “hutments,” little more than plywood frames without indoor plumbing. “Segregation was actually designed in from the start,” Moeller says.

*** end quote ***

How evil are the politicians and bureaucrats that did this?

I find that it was (a) designed in from the start; and (b) that people accepted it as fait accompli.

Of course, it wouldn’t happen today, but what evil was in these men’s hearts from the get go.

Sigh. So sad.

Is everything that Gooferment does inherently “evil” and “flawed”?

Seems so.

# – # – # – # – #

INTERESTING: What did Zuck delete? What did HRC delete? Who knew what and when?

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-5585351/What-Mark-Zuckerberg-hiding-Facebook-secretly-deleted-founders-private-messages.html

What is Mark Zuckerberg hiding? Facebook secretly deletes some of its founder’s private messages over fears sensitive data may be leaked

  • Three sources said old Facebook messages from Zuckerberg have disappeared
  • Recipients were not notified – raising concerns about what the CEO is hiding
  • Removal of messages was not disclosed publicly and users were not informed
  • Company’s ability to tamper with Messenger could be alarming for some users

By Phoebe Weston For Mailonline

PUBLISHED: 06:02 EDT, 6 April 2018 | UPDATED: 08:35 EDT, 6 April 2018

*** begin quote ***

Facebook has deleted some of Mark Zuckerberg’s private messages over fears sensitive data could be leaked.

Three sources claim old Facebook messages from Zuckerberg have disappeared from their inbox. 

The recipients were not notified – raising concerns about what the Facebook CEO could be hiding.

Facebook claims the change was made after the 2014 Sony Pictures hack, when a mass data breach at the movie studio resulted in embarrassing email histories being leaked. 

However, the lack of disclosure has angered some users, along with the absence of a similar tool to recall messages for normal users.

*** end quote ***

Very interesting?

Of course, his upcoming Congressional testimony could NOT have anything to do with this “discovery”.

Yeah right.

Guess old Zuck forgot the second rule of legal tactics: “Say it, forget it; Write it, regret it.”

That’s just after: “Say nothing; admit nothing; and strenuously deny everything.” a la Bill Clinton.

Argh!

Now everyone will learn that there is nothing so “free” as a “free” service.

Argh!

Remarkable comparison to HRC’s emails?

# – # – # – # – #

INTERESTING: Superb Fairywrens’ “secret password”

https://www.howtogeek.com/trivia/which-of-these-birds-teaches-their-offspring-a-secret-password-while-they-are-incubating/

Answer: Superb Fairywrens

In an incredibly clever bid to protect their offspring from parasitic bird species that would dump their young on superb fairywrens and flee, the wrens consistently use special vocalisations while the young wrens are still inside their eggs. Before parasitic birds like the Horsfield’s bronze-cuckoo can drop their eggs off in the nest, the wren’s own babies already know the secret vocalisation pattern by heart.

When all the eggs hatch, the wren chicks incorporate the secret vocalisation pattern into their begging for food and the mother provides the chicks that produce the vocalisation pattern the most accurately with the most food. The parasite’s chicks, on the other hand, don’t know the vocalisation pattern and the mother wren neglects them.

# – # – # – # – #

I love useless factoids. 

Now I need it on Final Jeopardy!

Laugh!

# – # – # – # – #

INTERESTING: Well we’ll see on Saint P’s day how many “clean lifers” there are?

FROM THE WALL STREET JOURNAL “The 10-Point”

*** begin quote ***

Clean Living 

They drink less alcohol, eat more vegetables and less meat, meditate often, enjoy knitting and make their own pour-over coffee. Meet the “clean lifers,” the young adults who revel in dodging the indulgences of their elders. These typically educated 20-to-29-year-olds pursue healthy living as a way of asserting control and finding comfort in an unstable world, says one market-research analyst, whose company identified the trend as one of the top 10 emerging forces shaping consumer behavior. That has led product makers to target young adults who aspire to moderation but still might want to buy a beer, brownie pan or a packaged salad. Having grown up during the recession, many of these 20-somethings pursue healthful living as a way to find balance amid the global uncertainty that continues today.

*** end quote ***

I’ll be watch the press for the usual signs of excess.

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INTERESTING: Have to update my “strategy” for final Jeopardy

http://ew.com/tv/2018/03/02/jeopardy-tiebreaker/

Jeopardy! makes history with first-ever sudden death tiebreaker

*** begin quote ***

Jeopardy! history was made when two contestants competed during the final tournament of Thursday’s episode. While all three of the show’s competitors wrote in wrong submissions for the Channel Islands prompt, Laura and Sarah found themselves in a tie, which led to the first-ever Final Jeopardy! tiebreaker.

The tiebreaker rules were announced in 2016: “If there are two or three players tied for first place after each contestant unveils their Final Jeopardy! response, [host] Alex [Trebek] will present one more category and read the clue. The clue has no dollar value and does not increase the player’s winnings.”

*** end quote ***

I didn’t know they changed the rules.

Personally, I don’t see any reason not to have c0-champions other that to save a few bucks.

Back when you could have them, I thought the leader should wager for a tie unless it was a blow out. This way, two folks would collect.

Now that it’s no longer a possibility, I guess the leader needs to play to win by a buck.

Sigh!

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