JPFO always remembers the Shoah (aka Holocaust) and it’s important for us to do so also!

Wednesday, May 3, 2006

http://www.jpfo.org/alert20060502.htm

***Begin Quote***

 – Taxes sap away as much as 40% of our income, a small portion of which can be relieved if you agree to _register your children_ with the federal government.

– You can be fined, jailed, or held indefinitely without trial for _thousands_ of administrative "infractions" as decreed by any of a number of unelected federal agencies (our "Boot the BATFE" campaign (www.jpfo.org/bootbatfe.htm) shows just how arbitrary those "infractions" can be!).

– We endure checkpoints, random searches, and demands for our "papers" on a regular basis ( http://www.papersplease.org/cases.html ).

– And just around the corner is the National Animal Identification System, which will require you to register your name, property and any livestock you may own, and you get to pay a fee for the privilege.

***End Quote***

The JPFO regards our Second Amendment as what went wrong in Nazi Germany. Just look what a few guns did in the Warsaw ghetto. There is a striking similarty between the Nazi gun laws and the United States gun laws. In order for a governement to kill its citizens, or the residents of its country, or the occupants of another country, it's necessary that they be unarmed. Visualize the brown shirts or the Gestapo breaking into a Jewish home to drag them off to the camps. Add one crummy revolver. Let's say that the head of household only gets the first one of the intruders. Pretty soon the you run out of intruders when losing one intruder per apartment. Look at the Liberator pistol http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Liberator_Pistol (aka the only weapon that took longer to load, or reload, then it did to make). If you couldn't spit on it, you probably couldn't hit it. Imagine the Genocide in Rawanda or Dafur. Bad guy with machette meets poor slob with a Liberator. Result = sudden shortage of bad guys.

The question is what will it take for us to recognize a police state here in the US. And what will you do about it?


What will she do if you never told her? … She’d use the brains that God gave her!

Wednesday, May 3, 2006

The gummamint's (government) anti-drug commercials are often stupid, down right dumb, or occasionally iritating. Tonight I saw one of the especially stupid ones. Reminds me of something I first heard from my now deceased mother in law.

Picture this. Young girl walks to car. A shimmering mother commands "Say thank you" to the socially inept kid. She gets in. The ghostly mother demands "Fasten your seat belt!" to the dumb kid. She's offered drugs. Silence. A stage voice says "What will she do if you never told her?"

I can hear my mother in law saying in a loud irritated voice: "She'd use the brains that God gave her!" which was her favorite rejoinder for any especially dumb idea, stupid action, or disastrous results.

I miss her common sense. I think the government has too much of our money to waste like this.

It's nobody business when people make bad choices, suffer the consequences, and have to overcome the results. Maybe then people will learn to make better choices rather than have Mommy Government to "protect" them paying for it by robbing everyone.

Arghhh!


Yahoo survey winds up into its own spam filter

Wednesday, May 3, 2006

How could that happen? It was amusing. Trapped by their own trap.

 P.S. The YIM75 install still isn't working. Arghhh!


Sigh, the FTL boys don’t know that Heinlein was a libertarian

Wednesday, May 3, 2006

http://freetalklive.com

I was listening to the Podcast of FTL when I heard them chatting with a caller about Robert A. Heinlein (1907-1988) and "Starship Troopers". RAH was the fellow who turned me to Libertarianism. I read his stuff over and over again. The hosts at FTL have "Starship Troopers" all wrong. It is about personal liberty! The book celebrates democracy, individuality, diversity, and free choice, in peacetime first; then wartime. The clueless high school senior evolves as a result of his choices and events to an adult, ultimately earning his father's respect. The book is a easy "hard read". Just from memory, let me hit a few high points.

(1) RAH in ST first made me question suffrage. In his alternate world, you are allowed to vote only if you have done something positive for society. Seems reasonable. Just being born, doesn't confer "wisdom" upon you. But, if you have to "pay" a stiff price for a "privilege" of voting, then you will think long and hard about the choices you make. RAH made the "privilege" universally available, everyone would be assigned something dirty, dangerous, and hard. You had to pay a high price in RAH's world to be allowed to steer the ship of state. An excellent concept.

(2) RAH in ST made me think about democracy and the popular majority. People cannot vote themselves into prosperity. They certainly shouldn't be allowed to vote away my past, preset, and future. It makes you think about fundamental assumptions that you have never brought up before. He brought up interesting insights in the "History & Moral Philosophy" class. I especially liked the dialogue, "My mother always told me that violence doesn't solve anything. Really? I wonder what the city founders of Hiroshima would have to say about that." It completely destroyed my thinking about peace and aggression. That led me to Ann Rand and the Zero Aggression Principle. Capital punishment, juvenile delinquency, civic virtue all got skewered in his world. He pointed out that there were millions of people already in America before the Europeans came and ruthlessly slaughtered these 'subhumans' on their new property. That made me think differnetly about such diverse topics as Columbus, the Spanish "missionaries", religion, and the Japanese Internment.

(3) RAH in ST introduced me to the concept of wolves and sheep. Only warriors should vote because they "know" the true cost of freedom. Very powerful concept. If you aren't willing to die for your country, then why should you be allowed to lead it. Today's politicians put our boys and girls at risk without that visceral understanding of what it means. With the backdrop of American's dying in VietNam, it hit home. I'm no John F. Kennedy fan, because he had the morals of an alley cat, but he did steer the US thru a dangerous time with Cuba and VietNam. If was LBJ who escalated the war there. And, while I'm no John McCain fan, I bet he would be more circumspect about using the military. Heinlein backs up wolves with the logic that "revolt is impossible". I always looked after that if I was being lead by a real "leader" with experience, or one with paper credentials.

(4) RAH made his military 100% voluntary. A unique concept. If a trooper didn't want to drop, he didn't have to. Far cry from today's all "volunteer" force.

He used the juvenile fiction novel genre to "sneak into" our heads with personal responsibility, non-aggression as opposed to pacifism, and objectivity.

Heinlein is pure American and IMHO his ideas are almost Jeffersonian.

"Correct morals arise from knowing what man is; not what do-gooders and well-meaning old Aunt Nellies would like him to be."

The book was a treasure. The movie was a joke. I beleive the hosts confused the two together. The book had a provocative depth. I learned and taught myself a lot as a result of it. Perhaps because RAH was an engineer, he new how to connect to a future engineer.

Stealing a line from the movie "Would you like to know more?"!!!!

###

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Starship_Troopers


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