A £1 tax on every incandescent light bulb

Monday, April 24, 2006

http://www.banthebulb.org/

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A £1 tax on every incandescent light bulb would help to increase the uptake of environmentally friendly technologies, and allow light bulb prices to include more of the environmental costs associated with wasting energy and burning fossil fuels.

Waiving this tax on energy-efficient lightbulbs would also encourage the uptake of existing technologies and drive further innovation.

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On the theory that any idea that increases taxes is a bad one, and on the theory that it's a global world of ideas (i.e., our thieves aka tax collectors will grasp any idea to increase their take), can some one explain to me how giving the government, any government, more of the our sweat of our collective brows will solve this problem.

If we assume that there is a problem as states (i.e., incandescent bulb waste energy and cause all sorts of mischief), then how do we nduce people to change their behavior? Now if we recognize taxes as theft, followed up by men with guns coming to kill us, perhaps we might try some simpler ideas.

Educate people. Work on the economics not by raising the cost of bulbs (i.e., increasing the cost of incandescent bulbs by taxes) but by decreasing the cost of the alternatives. By getting people to look at the total cost of ownership.

AND, by the way, I bet the government, of which the originator seeks to empower with more tax money, probably is the biggest energy waster and incandescent bulb user on the planet.

So much for that good intention paving the way to hell for us.

Fix the government like a cat. Spay and neuter your local politcians!


I too would like Linux on my primary!

Monday, April 24, 2006

http://www.wynia.org/wordpress/2006/04/24/widescreen-virtual-linux-workstation-via-vmware-and-ubuntu/

Widescreen Virtual Linux Workstation via VMWare and Ubuntu
April 24th, 2006 by J Wynia – 

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However, what I’ve wanted all along is to have Linux right on my true primary workstation: my laptop. I tried several times to get Linux to cooperate with my previous laptop,  

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Me too. Maybe my next laptop will allow me to do this on my current lugable.

Hmmm.

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What is a “libertarian”?

Monday, April 24, 2006

http://www.smallgov.org/?p=195

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A libertarian is, if nothing else, a person with at least an intuitive grasp of the parameters within which the abstract structures of human society must be limited. A person who at least implicitly grasps that as the seat of human intelligence, the individual must be afforded a maximum of personal freedom in order for the social structure to be consistent with fundamental, immutable human nature. 

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I think I'd prefer the definition "A Libertarian is anyone who believes in the Zero Aggression Principle and acts that way. So I would expect that they would renounce the use of force to achieve social and political goals.

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Where is “Walter Knudsen” avenue?

Monday, April 24, 2006

http://www.siouxcityjournal.com/articles/2006/04/23/news/top/05ab7f414cdfe98886257159000c25b8.txt#blogcomments

Missing 60 years, World War II hero buried with honors
By Dolly A. Butz Journal staff writer

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Staff Sgt. Walter Knudsen, a World War II B-24 gunnery instructor from Sioux City was praised as an American hero at a graveside ceremony with full military honors Saturday at Memorial Park Cemetery.

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We should remember the cost in blood and treasure of all these men and women. Personally, before we dedicate buildings and name streets for politicians, we should have then named for our honored dead. Where is "Walter Knudsen" avenue? In the government skools in Iowa, they should teach about Walter Knudsen. At least, the students would learn that freedom has a price.


“If you go to a market and are offered free fruit and vegetables, you know they’ll be rotten.”

Monday, April 24, 2006

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,6-2137428,00.html

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Last week I was in a deprived fishing village in Ghana that boasts six flourishing private schools only yards from the state school. A fisherman with an understanding of economics that would put union officials to shame, who had moved his daughter from state to private school, told me that the private school proprietor needed to satisfy parents like him, otherwise he would go out of business. “That’s why the teachers turn up and teach,” he told me, “because they are closely supervised.” His wife, busy smoking fish for sale in the market, concurred. “In the state school, our daughter learnt nothing. Now she’s back on track.”

These parents understand what apparently baffles those in the unions, so used to the dependency culture of the West — that what is handed out for free is likely to be low quality. One father, living in the Kenyan slum of Kibera, summarised it like this: “If you go to a market and are offered free fruit and vegetables, you know they’ll be rotten. If you want fresh produce, you have to pay for it.”

Real privatisation occurs only if the customers of education are empowered, if the educational providers are made accountable to them. We have found a very effective way of doing that over the millennia — it’s called the price mechanism. Only when people pay for something can they be in real control. Poor parents in the developing world recognise this with crystal clarity.

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When the people of this country realize the "Barbara Striesand" that they are being sold, then maybe we will have true Separation of Education and State.


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