Japan may have beaten Coronavirus without lockdowns or mass testing. But how?

No restrictions were placed on residents’ movements, and businesses from restaurants to hairdressers stayed open. No high-tech apps that tracked people’s movements were deployed. The country doesn’t have a center for disease control. And even as nations were exhorted to “test, test, test,” Japan has tested just 0.2% of its population — one of the lowest rates among developed countries.

Yet the curve has been flattened, with deaths well below 1,000, by far the fewest among the Group of Seven developed nations. In Tokyo, its dense center, cases have dropped to single digits on most days. While the possibility of a more severe second wave of infection is ever-present, Japan has entered and is set to leave its emergency in just weeks, with the status lifted already for most of the country and Tokyo and the remaining four other regions set to exit Monday.

Source: Japan may have beaten Coronavirus without lockdowns or mass testing. But how?

# – # – # – # – #

Why was Japan different?

—30—

How film goddess Carole Lombard became Hollywood’s first casualty of WW II

Daily Variety editor Arthur Ungar penned a page-one tribute to Lombard that led the Jan. 19, 1942, edition.

“Carole Lombard died in the line of duty. She was the first casualty of show business in this world war. She was in active service on a mission in defense of the United States —  selling Defense Bonds — when death suddenly overtook her in the skies,” Ungar wrote.At a time when the country was polarized about whether to enter the conflict, Lombard had been an outspoken supporter of President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

It was no surprise that she was among the first in what Variety then referred to as “the film colony” to raise her hand to help the war effort. U.S. Treasury officials put the movie star to work selling war bonds to finance the enormous military and industrial response to Japan’s bombing of Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.

Source: How film goddess Carole Lombard became Hollywood’s first casualty of WW II

# – # – # – # – #

World War II impacted Hollywood differently then. After that, they no longer were “Americans” imho.

—30—