RANT: An Israeli Perspective on events in Egypt

Monday, January 31, 2011

http://pajamasmedia.com/blog/watching-egypt-burn-an-israeli-perspective/

Watching Egypt Burn: An Israeli Perspective
What is happening now in Egypt has immediate and potentially disastrous consequences for the Jewish state. (Also read Roger L. Simon at the Tatler: “Cluless Israel wakes up on PR (sort of)”)
January 31, 2011 – by Benjamin Kerstein

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The result has been that most Israelis have long since given up hope that the Arab world can or wanted to change. Things were the way they were and we would have to accept that. As a result, two schools of thought developed: One held that, since the Arabs would never change, we would have to reach peaceful reconciliation with the situation as it was, however difficult and unstable. The other claimed that peace with such neighbors was ultimately impossible, and that Israel should hunker down, make itself as close to militarily invulnerable as possible, and look to its own prosperity and development. This situation has held for decades, and even the American push for democratization during the war with Iraq did not change things. Most Israelis considered it misguided idealism at best and dangerous naivete at worst.

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As a little L libertarian, I’m astonished at what passes for American “foreign policy”.

There’s nothing more dangerous that being a ally or a friend of the USA Gooferment. (Either party can be at the controls. They are equally untrustworthy.)

Remember the airlift out of Saigon? How many of our friends were tortured to death?

The Dead Old White Guys were correct — no entangling alliances.

Switzerland has the meme.

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RANT: There’s a time to NOT shoot from the hip!

Monday, January 31, 2011

RANT TRIGGERED BY A SIGNATURE LINE

> Optimism— Why not?

Optimism — Why not? — It depends!

Depends upon where the waterline is relative to your nose! Personally, I’d suggest that there’s a time for optimism (i.e., bet on a positive outcome) and a time for pessimism (i.e., bet on a negative outcome). I think everyone does that almost instinctively. My personal rule is: “Does the Titanic sink if I hit the iceberg?” Optimism is appropriate when an adverse result won’t have catastrophic consequences? Pessimism is almost obligatory when the result would be catastrophic, irreversible, or uncorrectable.

imho

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