VETERANS: D-Day — anyone remember it?

https://www.army.mil/d-day/history.html

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The Normandy beaches were chosen by planners because they lay within range of air cover, and were less heavily defended than the obvious objective of the Pas de Calais, the shortest distance between Great Britain and the Continent. Airborne drops at both ends of the beachheads were to protect the flanks, as well as open up roadways to the interior. Six divisions were to land on the first day; three U.S., two British and one Canadian. Two more British and one U.S. division were to follow up after the assault division had cleared the way through the beach defenses.

Disorganization, confusion, incomplete or faulty implementation of plans characterized the initial phases of the landings. This was especially true of the airborne landings which were badly scattered, as well as the first wave units landing on the assault beaches. To their great credit, most of the troops were able to adapt to the disorganization. In the end, the Allies achieved their objective.

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307

Technician Fifth Grade John J. Pinder Jr.

Unit: 16th Infantry, 1st Infantry Division

Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity above and beyond the call of duty on 6 June 1944, near Colleville-sur-Mer, France. On D-day, Technician 5th Grade Pinder landed on the coast 100 yards off shore under devastating enemy machinegun and artillery fire which caused severe casualties among the boatload. Carrying a vitally important radio, he struggled towards shore in waist-deep water. Only a few yards from his craft he was hit by enemy fire and was gravely wounded. Technician 5th Grade Pinder never stopped. He made shore and delivered the radio. Refusing to take cover afforded, or to accept medical attention for his wounds, Technician 5th Grade Pinder, though terribly weakened by loss of blood and in fierce pain, on 3 occasions went into the fire-swept surf to salvage communication equipment. He recovered many vital parts and equipment, including another workable radio. On the 3rd trip he was again hit, suffering machinegun bullet wounds in the legs. Still this valiant soldier would not stop for rest or medical attention. Remaining exposed to heavy enemy fire, growing steadily weaker, he aided in establishing the vital radio communication on the beach. While so engaged this dauntless soldier was hit for the third time and killed. The indomitable courage and personal bravery of Technician 5th Grade Pinder was a magnificent inspiration to the men with whom he served.

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“A soldier accepts personal responsibility for the safety of the body politic of which he is a member, defending it, if need be, with his life. The civilian does not.” — Lt. Col. Jean V. Dubois (Ret.) and student, p. 26 Starship Troopers (1959) by Robert A. Heinlein

GBA

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HISTORICAL: 71st Anniversary of D-Day

http://nw2m.convio.net/site/Calendar?view=Detail&id=118841&__utma=146201003.1369108149.1433080299.1433080299.1433080299.1&__utmb=146201003.2.10.1433080299&__utmc=146201003&__utmx=-&__utmz=146201003.1433080299.1.1.utmgclid=Cj0KEQjw4qqrBRDE2K_z7Pbvjo8BEiQA39AImXYHlrHVoq8HFoO-v5Km_Lxyw57u1MFstvOEm3zRkD4aAk2n8P8HAQ?referrer=http://www.google.com/aclk?sa=l|utmccn=(not%20set)|utmcmd=(not%20set)&__utmv=-&__utmk=234226846

Commemorating the 71st Anniversary of D-Day and the Museum’s 15th Anniversary

In fact, the institution we now know as The National WWII Museum was once dedicated entirely to the story of D-Day in Normandy. With founder (and noted author) Stephen E. Ambrose at the helm, it opened in June 2000 in New Orleans—home of shipbuilder Andrew Higgins, whose production of the amphibious Higgins Boats led Eisenhower to describe him as “the man who won the war for us.” Now 15 years later, The National WWII Museum is one of the most popular museums in the world, and home to historical collections and scholarship that span the entire scope of America’s WWII story. The Museum is also a center for ongoing research and outreach, innovating every day to reach students, teachers, veterans, and visitors like never before.

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I wonder how many people will remember the slaughter on the beaches.

And this was against a weakened Germany that was bled by their Russian disaster.

How was history changed by this blood letting?

And blame it all on Wilson and FDR.

Argh!

Also “We, The Sheeple” have learned nothing from all these wars.

Seems like a good anniversary to bring all the girls and boys home now.

Requiescat In Pacem

Dona Nobis Pacem

Let’s not forget!

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INSPIRATIONAL: Anyone remember the Sixth of June?

http://www.ddaymuseum.co.uk/d-day/d-day-and-the-battle-of-normandy-your-questions-answered

D-Day and the Battle of Normandy: Your Questions Answered

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How many Allied and German casualties were there on D-Day, and in the Battle of Normandy?

“Casualties” refers to all losses suffered by the armed forces: killed, wounded, missing in action (meaning that their bodies were not found) and prisoners of war. There is no “official” casualty figure for D-Day. Under the circumstances, accurate record keeping was very difficult. For example, some troops who were listed as missing may actually have landed in the wrong place, and have rejoined their parent unit only later.

In April and May 1944, the Allied air forces lost nearly 12,000 men and over 2,000 aircraft in operations which paved the way for D-Day.

The Allied casualties figures for D-Day have generally been estimated at 10,000, including 2500 dead. Broken down by nationality, the usual D-Day casualty figures are approximately 2700 British, 946 Canadians, and 6603 Americans. However recent painstaking research by the US National D-Day Memorial Foundation has achieved a more accurate – and much higher – figure for the Allied personnel who were killed on D-Day. They have recorded the names of individual Allied personnel killed on 6 June 1944 in Operation Overlord, and so far they have verified 2499 American D-Day fatalities and 1915 from the other Allied nations, a total of 4414 dead (much higher than the traditional figure of 2500 dead). Further research may mean that these numbers will increase slightly in future. The details of this research will in due course be available on the Foundation’s website at http://www.dday.org. This new research means that the casualty figures given for individual units in the next few paragraphs are no doubt inaccurate, and hopefully more accurate figures will one day be calculated.

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In my life, I’ve met few D-Day vets. When you could induce them to talk about it, the memories were vivid.

The Sixth of June, how many will remember it at all?

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