These 30 Responses To U.S. Army Asking ‘How Has Serving Impacted You?’ Was Not What They Were Expecting To Hear

Monday, May 27, 2019

Memorial Day weekend is meant to be a time of reflection to honor the Americans who have served, so two days before the weekend the U.S. Army reached out to veterans via Twitter to ask them to share how their service had impacted their lives – and it’s easy to say it backfired.

Source: These 30 Responses To U.S. Army Asking ‘How Has Serving Impacted You?’ Was Not What They Were Expecting To Hear

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Read this and then tell me about how much America reveres its vets.

Best way to honor them is to bring all the girls and boys home now.

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“Wikipedia is…broken,” controlled by special interests and bad actors, says co-founder | Sharyl Attkisson

Monday, May 27, 2019

What’s worse is that agenda editors related to pharmaceutical interests and the partisan blog Media Matters control my Wikipedia biographical page, making sure that slanted or false information stays on it. For example, they falsely refer to my reporting as “anti-vaccine,” and imply my reporting on the topic has been discredited. In fact, my vaccine and medical reporting has been recognized by top national journalism awards organizations, and has even been cited as a source in a peer reviewed scientific publication. However, anyone who tries to edit this factual context and footnotes onto my page finds it is quickly removed.

Source: “Wikipedia is…broken,” controlled by special interests and bad actors, says co-founder | Sharyl Attkisson

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Maybe the academics were correct in not allowing Wikipedia citations in academic papers?

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VETERANS: Interesting Veterans Statistics off the Vietnam Memorial Wall

Monday, May 27, 2019

2019-May-27

http://ncc-1776.org/tle2018/tle998-20181111-03.html

History most people will never know.
Interesting Veterans Statistics off the Vietnam Memorial Wall
by Unknown Person on the ’Net
Special to L. Neil Smith’s The Libertarian Enterprise

*** begin quote ***

There are 58,267 names now listed on that polished black wall, including those added in 2010.

The names are arranged in the order in which they were taken from us by date and within each date the names are alphabetized. It is hard to believe it is 62 years since the first casualty.

The first known casualty was Richard B. Fitzgibbon, of North Weymouth, Mass. Listed by the U.S. Department of Defense as having been killed on June 8, 1956. His name is listed on the Wall with that of his son, Marine Corps LCpl Richard B. Fitzgibbon III, who was killed on Sept. 7, 1965.

There are three sets of fathers and sons on the Wall.

39,996 on the Wall were just 22 or younger.

8,283 were just 19 years old.

The largest age group, 33,103 were 18 years old.

12 soldiers on the Wall were 17 years old.

5 soldiers on the Wall were 16 years old.

One soldier, PFC Dan Bullock was 15 years old.

997 soldiers were killed on their first day in Vietnam.

1,448 soldiers were killed on their last day in Vietnam.

31 sets of brothers are on the Wall.

Thirty one sets of parents lost two of their sons.

54 soldiers attended Thomas Edison High School in Philadelphia. I wonder why so many from one school.

8 Women are on the Wall, Nursing the wounded.

244 soldiers were awarded the Medal of Honor during the Vietnam War; 153 of them are on the Wall.

Beallsville, Ohio with a population of 475 lost 6 of her sons.

West Virginia had the highest casualty rate per capita in the nation. There are 711 West Virginians on the Wall.

*** and ***

For most Americans who read this they will only see the numbers that the Vietnam War created. To those of us who survived the war, and to the families of those who did not, we see the faces, we feel the pain that these numbers created. We are, until we too pass away, haunted with these numbers, because they were our friends, brothers and sisters of our friends, neighbors, classmates, fathers, husbands, wives, uncles, aunts, fellow workers, fellow students, sons and daughters There are no noble wars, just noble warriors.

Please pass this on to those who served during this time, and those who DO Care.

I’ve also sent this to those that I hope care very much, and I thank you for caring as you do.

[Tip o’ the Hat to to Jim Woosley, who sent this along.

And I must ask, what did all those mostly young people die for? Not for their country, there was no benefit to their country from that “war” (since it was not declared by Congress it couldn’t be a war). Did they die so American tire manufacturers could continue to get cheap rubber from the plantations? Or what? Nobody knows, and those who know—if any—aren’t telling. — Editor, (who has a number of guys he grew up with listed on that wall.) ]

*** end quote ***

What can one say?

Not all the “casualties” are on the Wall.  There are many, who were “collateral damage”, like my best friend from high school who went underground as did a ⅓ of the eligible draftees and died in an MVA while “hiding”.

Sad to say, it was a national disaster and a national disgrace. 

Argh!

“Happy” Memorial Day.

Can we all tell the politicians and bureaucrats to stop wasting lives like these?

Argh!

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