INOVATION: “Cat music”?

Friday, February 9, 2018

https://www.futilitycloset.com/2018/02/04/cat-music/

CAT MUSIC

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Accordingly they got musician David Teie to compose three songs that ought to appeal to felines and tried them out on 47 domestic cats, comparing their reactions to Bach’s “Air on a G String” and Fauré’s “Elegie.” The cat music was pitched about an octave higher than human voices, and its tempos replicated purring and suckling rather than a human heartbeat.

The cats showed no interest in the music intended for humans, but they showed a “significant preference for and interest in” Teie’s cat-targeted songs, approaching the speakers and often rubbing their scent glands on them. Also, for some reason young and old cats seemed to like the cat music better than middle-aged ones.

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Wonder if there is a “bird music”?

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INOVATION: The new journalist muckraker

Monday, January 29, 2018

https://nypost.com/2018/01/21/james-okeefe-is-bringing-back-the-best-practice-of-journalism/

OPINION
James O’Keefe is bringing back the best practice of journalism
By Michael Goodwin
January 21, 2018 | 1:02am

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Grading President Trump’s first year in office is all the media rage. But let’s look at the other side of the story — and grade the media.

F for effort, F for result and F for the lack of honesty.

That’s not a blanket condemnation of every journalist at every news organization. There are many hardworking professionals who try to get the facts right and keep their opinions to themselves.

*** and ***

The collapse of journalism as we knew it, and the lack of any sign of a return to traditional standards, explains why I found myself in an unfamiliar setting last week. It was the book launch of “American Pravda,” the latest work by James O’Keefe, the founder of Project Veritas.

A self-described “guerilla journalist,” O’Keefe and his team use disguises and false identities to secretly videotape people in hopes they will admit breaking the law or abusing their power.

*** and ***

Most recently, for example, he captured current and former Twitter managers admitting they use “shadowbans,” which effectively hide a user’s tweets, based on content, without notifying the user.

Other personnel admitted the company tracks user behavior and reads direct messages to find prohibited content.

*** and ***

He accused mainstream journalists of “groupthink,” saying they “move in packs . . . like blackbirds on a telephone wire. They’re all talking about the same thing.”

His goal is to “dent the fortress and crack the dam” so the public knows who is abusing power.

O’Keefe has a passion for gathering facts and sharing them that recalls the best journalists I have known. And he is right that journalism history was written by people who went undercover to expose scandals.

Upton Sinclair, whom he cited, lived and dressed like a worker, even carrying a lunch pail, to fit in with the men who toiled in “The Jungle,” his takedown of Chicago’s meatpacking industry.

And Nellie Bly feigned mental illness so she could become a patient and expose the horrors of a New York lunatic asylum for women on what is now Roosevelt Island.

O’Keefe is in that mold. Smart, committed and fearless, he’s a modern muckraker worth watching.

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And, boy, does the “muck” ever need raking!

The only other journalist I trust is Sharyl Attkisson!

Read her story and the various O’Keefe ones and you’ll see how biased the “lame stream media” is.

A national disgrace.

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INOVATION: “Wall Bonds” to build “the Wall”?

Thursday, January 18, 2018

http://ncc-1776.org/tle2018/tle956-20180114-02.html

All About The Wall 
by L. Neil Smith 
lneil@netzero.com
Attribute to L. Neil Smith’s The Libertarian Enterprise

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If it were up to me, the proposed Mexican border Wall would be a straightforward replica of the Great Wall of China, at least thirty feet high, with crenelated “rails” or battlements, and wide enough that a pair of chariots (or tanks) could pass each other along the top. It would be a lot cheaper to cast in place out of reinforced concrete than it was for the ancient Chinese, building one brick at a time. I would let the “beautiful giant doors” Trump wants to set in the Wall become the seeds of new Southwestern communities, new cities on both sides of the border, with shops and restaurants and museums and other features that will help both countries pay for the attraction. Plans I’ve seen and approve of include two sets of high-speed monorail tracks along the top of the Wall, for vehicles going both ways. Initially, they will be for construction and maintenance. Eventually, the planners want excursion and sight-seeing trains—with bullet-proof glass—for tourists taking the 2700-mile trip from Southern California to Southern Texas. I’m ready to go, right now.

Anything less than a real Wall speaks dismally of a lack of cultural resolve. It also doesn’t do the Donald any good at the polls. Loose talk that there will be gaps where mountains and rivers will help form a “natural barrier” is half-hearted crap. Mountains and rivers won’t impede the hardy, intrepid people tradition calls “wetbacks”. Either America has got its skyscraper-building, dam-building, bridge-building, highway-building, space-station-building, Lunar colony-building cojones back or it has not. Mountains and rivers never stopped the ancient Chinese wall-builders, and the border monorail needs to be continuous to attract the dollars and pesos and pounds and euros and rubles and yen and yuan, etc. A really great Wall could bring people together.

How to pay for it initially? Two words: Wall Bonds. A tax on money being sent south by immigrants, illegal and otherwise, could begin paying them off. Millions of tourists from all over the world eager to enjoy one aspect or another of the Wall (including one hell of a train ride) will keep the money flowing. I don’t know about you, but I’d invest.

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I like the idea of making it a tourist attraction.

I’d buy one just to see the damned thing. Like the Great Wall of China or the Pyramids.

Seriously!

(No one ever said I had to be consistent. And I like this idea about it. Make it useful.)

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INOVATION: Happy “Underwear Day”?

Monday, January 1, 2018

http://www.commanderzero.com/?p=4648

Underwear Day
Posted on December 16, 2017

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It’s not exactly a holiday, but today was Underwear

Day. Every two years or so I throw out all my socks, all my underwear, and most of my t-shirts, and start over.

Three dozen socks (all matching), three dozen boxer briefs, and three dozen black t-shirts. One pass through Costco and I’m pretty much done for the next two years.

Are some socks still good after two years? Some, not many. My rather oversize feet tend to wear socks and shoes out pretty quickly.

{Extraneous Deleted}

So…every two years I scrap the whole thing and start over. One benefit to this policy is that I don’t have to match socks. In fact, if I get a hole in one sock I can toss it, keep the good one, and just mix it in with the others….they’re all identical.

It’s a very guy way to buy clothes.

*** end quote ***

What a great idea!

If I wasn’t so “thrifty”, I could throw out stuff that was not EOL! (That “end of life” for my one Luddite reader.)

I do like the no matching. I have a pile of “orphans”.

Maybe if I was  thin, young, and handsome (again), then I could do it.

Wonder how he handles it when you need brown socks for your “brown” outfits?

Hmmmm, maybe that’s the draw back.

Comments?

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P.S.: Seasonal Greetings from a grinch!

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INOVATION: Like checklists, anything to make it safer

Wednesday, December 20, 2017

http://www.smh.com.au/national/health/rabblerousing-surgical-staff-wear-their-names-on-their-caps-to-stop-mixups-and-improve-patient-safety-20171211-h02o1c.html

Rabble-rousing surgical staff wear their names on their caps to stop mix-ups and improve patient safety
Kate Aubusson

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Dr Rob Hackett was met with smirks and confused, occasionally derisive, looks when he started turning up to surgeries with his name and profession emblazoned in bold black typeface across his scrub cap.

“Rob … Anaesthetist”, his forehead announced to colleagues and patients alike.

*** end quote ***

When I first read about the effect of using to checklist in preventing surgical agents, I thought that was a great breakthrough.

This can rank right up there.

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INOVATION: The rates of traffic flow on different kinds of 4-way intersections

Tuesday, December 19, 2017

This is an animation of traffic flows simulated on 30 different kinds of four-way junctions, from two roads intersecting with no traffic lights or signs to complex stacked interchanges that feature very few interactions between individual cars.

Source: The rates of traffic flow on different kinds of 4-way intersections

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Clearly, someone spent a lot of time thinking about this. How much does progress cost?

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INNOVATION: Evaluating generals! How about CEOs?

Monday, December 11, 2017

https://towardsdatascience.com/napoleon-was-the-best-general-ever-and-the-math-proves-it-86efed303eeb

Ethan Arsht @ethanarsht. ethanarsht [at] gmail.com.
Dec 4

Napoleon was the Best General Ever, and the Math Proves it.

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Inspired by baseball sabermetrics, I opted to use a system of Wins Above Replacement (WAR). WAR is often used as an estimate of a baseball player’s contributions to his team. It calculates the total wins added (or subtracted) by the player compared to a replacement-level player. For example, a baseball player with 5 WAR contributed 5 additional wins to his team, compared to the average contributions of a high-level minor league player. WAR is far from perfect, but provides a way to compare players based on one statistic.

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Wonder if you could use this in CEOs, Managers, or even Individual Contributors in an enterprise?

Might make the process fairer and better.

Closest I’ve ever seen and been part of was “ratings and rankings” tried at AT&T and CSFB.

That broke down when you as a supervisor had a really good team. You’d be forced to pick winners and losers. Argh!

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