The Land of Immortals: How and what Japan’s oldest population eats – CNN

Friday, April 5, 2019

Ikigai, loosely translated, means sense of purpose in life. And in Okinawa, a person’s ikigai often grows as they get older. It is their reason for living, that thing that propels them out of bed in the morning. In the United States, people often retire in their mid-60s, but there isn’t a similar word in Japanese because the concept of retirement doesn’t even exist.Moai is an informal social group of people who have common interests and look out for each other. Your moai is your “tribe” and another reason Okinawans believe they live so long.

Source: The Land of Immortals: How and what Japan’s oldest population eats – CNN

*  *  *  *  *

Very interesting ideas — Ikigai and Moai — here.

— 30 —


Arkansas Declares War on Cauliflower Rice

Friday, April 5, 2019

Following the old practice of economic protectionism, lobbyists from big rice signed a formal public letter complaining about the rise in popularity that these carbs substitutes have been earning among the health-conscious. If you’re a politician that wants to stay in the good graces of big rice, you’d be best to heed their call.

Source: Arkansas Declares War on Cauliflower Rice

# – # – # – # – #

Ahhh, yes, politicians and bureaucrats follow the instructions of their masters, Crony Capitalists.

Argh!

— 30 —


A Pretextual Traffic Stop Should Require Sufficient Pretext | Cato @ Liberty

Friday, April 5, 2019

Hopefully, SCOTUS agrees to hear the Sievers case or summarily reverses the Nebraska Supreme Court. SCOTUS has already ceded too much leeway to police to stop motorists as pretext, but police officers should at least meet the minimum standard for a legal stop.

Source: A Pretextual Traffic Stop Should Require Sufficient Pretext | Cato @ Liberty

# – # – # – # – #

Yeah, seek one part of the Gooferment to protect us from another part of the Gooferment.

Don’t be surprised at the outcome.

— 30 —


These 30 WWII Photos From Japanese Internment Camp Were Censored And Now Everyone Can See Them | Bored Panda

Friday, April 5, 2019

On February 19, 1942, just a couple months after the attack, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed Executive Order to deport and incarcerate all Japanese-Americans. Thousands of people, many of whom were born in the US, were forced to abandon their houses, businesses, farms, and possessions. They were loaded into busses with only as many things as they can carry with no knowledge of where they’re going and how long they’re staying there.A photographer Dorothea Lange who is probably best known for her photo titled Migrant Mother was hired by the US government to document the evacuation. The photographer perfectly captured the devastating moments of Japanese-Americans leaving their old lives behind and entering into the unknown. However, the military wasn’t happy with Lange’s opposing opinion of the internment camps. The photographs were seized from her and only made public in 2006. Today we finally have the opportunity to look back at this particular moment in history and see for our selves how the lives of Japanese-Americans were changed forever.

Source: These 30 WWII Photos From Japanese Internment Camp Were Censored And Now Everyone Can See Them | Bored Panda

# – # – # – # – #

It can’t possibly have happened here?

And, it can’t possibly happen again?

“And how we burned in the camps later, thinking: What would things have been like if every Security operative, when he went out at night to make an arrest, had been uncertain whether he would return alive and had to say good-bye to his family? Or if, during periods of mass arrests, as for example in Leningrad, when they arrested a quarter of the entire city, people had not simply sat there in their lairs, paling with terror at every bang of the downstairs door and at every step on the staircase, but had understood they had nothing left to lose and had boldly set up in the downstairs hall an ambush of half a dozen people with axes, hammers, pokers, or whatever else was at hand? . . .” — Alexander Solzhenitsyn

— 30 —


The Green Bad Deal | | Tenth Amendment Center

Friday, April 5, 2019

Like all forms of socialism, the Green New Deal suffers from what Ludwig von Mises identified as the “calculation problem.” Knowledge of the most efficient use of resources is conveyed by prices set in a free market. Prices reflect individuals’ subjective preferences regarding the best use of resources. When government uses force to remove resources from the marketplace, it makes it impossible for the price system to function, leaving government officials and private citizens unable to determine the most efficient use of resources. That is why every attempt at government management of the economy inevitably reduces the people’s standard of living.

Source: The Green Bad Deal | | Tenth Amendment Center

# – # – # – # – #

“Like all forms of socialism” leads to poverty, death, and destruction.

“That is why every attempt at government management of the economy” leads to Unintended Consequences!

That’s why to the socialist “Green Dealers” I say “you are out of your <synonym for the act of procreation> minds”!

— 30 —


%d bloggers like this: