RANT: And the airlines wonder why

Saturday, July 29, 2017

https://www.wsj.com/articles/that-airline-seat-you-paid-for-isnt-yours-1501081568?mod=djem10point

Please Be Seated

If you buy an assigned seat at a theater, sports arena or concert venue, you get the seat you picked. But an assigned seat on an airline is radically different: Every so often, you don’t get it, even when you pay extra for it. Premium-seating fees guarantee nothing. It’s happened to families who see their children reassigned rows away from their parents. It’s happened to single travelers when airline computers automatically shuffle seats on full flights. It’s happened to political commentator Ann Coulter. But why? Airlines started placing price tags on particular seats in about 2010. But they didn’t really change their procedures at airport gates to match the marketing. We look at why passengers’ expectations often don’t match up with reality.

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That Airline Seat You Paid for Isn’t Yours
Frustrated fliers discover that paying for a preferred seat on a flight guarantees them nothing
By Scott McCartney
Updated July 26, 2017 1:37 p.m. ET

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If you buy an assigned seat at a theater, sports or concert venue, you get the seat you picked. But an assigned seat on an airline is radically different: Every so often, you don’t get it, even when you pay extra for it. Premium-seating fees guarantee nothing.

It’s happened to families who see their children reassigned rows away from their parents. It’s happened to single travelers when airline computers automatically shuffle seats on full flights. And it famously happened to political commentator Ann Coulter, who erupted in a Twitter tirade earlier in July after Delta moved her from a preferred aisle seat to a window seat in the same extra-legroom row. Delta roared back, calling her out for attacking employees and the airline over what was at best a minor inconvenience.

Airlines started placing price tags on particular seats—letting fliers pay an ancillary fee for a preferred seat, often with extra legroom—in about 2010. But they didn’t really change their procedures at airport gates to match the marketing. That means passengers’ expectations often don’t match up with reality.

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Sorry but this is all “barbara streisand”!

Nothing but pure “bait and switch”. Maybe if the Big Airlines weren’t “in bed” with Big Gooferment, the traveler would get a fair shake.

Sounds like an “unfair and unequal” contract. Doesn’t Judy Judy say that isn’t allowed. Much like the shrink-wrap, “license disclosure after purchase”, and “terms & conditions” in 3 point red font on red background in retail cars! 

Sorry, that’s why flying is when you just have NO OTHER CHOICE. Bring on the self-driving cars.

Argh!

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