MONEY: Thoughts on Bob Murphy’s “Infinite Banking Concept”

2019-Jan-31

https://tomwoods.com/ep-1326-how-to-secede-from-our-monetary-regime/

Ep. 1326 How to Secede From Our Monetary Regime
22nd January 2019 — Tom Woods

*** begin quote *** 
 
Frequent guest Bob Murphy returns, this time talking about his new (co-authored) book, The Case for IBC. This is an acronym for “Infinite Banking Concept,” a strategy that uses properly designed whole life insurance policies as a way to “become your own banker.” The concept was developed by Nelson Nash, who besides working in insurance was personally tutored in Austrian theory by Leonard Read himself. Bob explains how the average person can benefit from IBC, and he answers common objections like “Isn’t it better to buy term and invest the difference?” and “Why would I put my money in life insurance when the dollar is going to crash?”

*** end quote ***

My initial thought:

I (humbly) suggest another reason for the IBC concept. One can only by insurance when reasonable healthy. I had a young 30 something coworker who became uninsurable after surviving a bout with cancer. In his case, buying a whole life policy, when he was younger and healthier, would have given his family the death benefit protection. He died in his 50’s. So I’d suggest the IBC concept would avoid the “insurability” problem should it arise. Buying any insurance may not be possible later in life. Am I missing something here?
 
To which Bob responded:

BobMurphy9  ferdinand reinke • 7 days ago
You’re right. That has to do with the “buy term and invest the difference” canard. I think on the episode I contrasted the jump in premiums if you wanted to renew your term policy, but yeah, if you develop a condition in the meantime, you might be uninsurable.

Now upon reflection on “buy term and invest the difference”:

Based on my own personality, and that of many other “spendthrifts” I see around me, I think there are two types of people — spenders and savers.  My now deceased wife grew up poor, was scared for life, and was a prodigious saver.  My maternal grandmother and my mother grew up in the Depression and also were prodigious savers.  I, OTOH, am a “spender”; maybe even a “spendthrift”, who never cared about delaying gratification.  I can identify others who fall into one of those two categories. 

Now with that in mind, considering the “buy term and invest the difference” canard, imho, “savers” can do that easily, but “spenders” can’t.  So for spenders, whole life insurance and the IBC concept makes a lot of sense.  All though, I’m not quite sure how one in their “earning days” could get on it or into it.  

Unlike savings in a CD ladder (https://reinkefaceslife.com/2007/08/17/money-creating-a-ladder/), which my wife loved, entry and exit was easy.  In today’s Fed-driven insane zero interest rate climate, the CD ladder makes no sense.

Hope this is of interest and helps someone further back on the road of life.  As I like to say, “if I knew then what I know now, my life would be completely different”.  Not sure it would be better or worse; just different. Unfortunately, in life, one can not just “rewind time” and choose differently.  It doesn’t work that way.  And one can’t even say a choice was “wrong”, since you made the choice at the time with feelings, imperfect information, and outlooks that structured your decision.  All you can say is that the results were what they are.  

Even “bad” results are how we are viewing the results in the eyes of the Monday Morning Quarterback. Shoulda, coulda, and woulda!  An alternative future history.  What might have been?  You can drive yourself crazy and make yourself sad about “missed opportunities”, “missed loves”, and “bad mistakes”.  

*** begin quote ***

And now, the end is near
And so I face the final curtain
My friend, I’ll say it clear
I’ll state my case, of which I’m certain
I’ve lived a life that’s full
I traveled each and every highway
And more, much more than this, I did it my way

Regrets, I’ve had a few
But then again, too few to mention
I did what I had to do and saw it through without exemption
I planned each charted course, each careful step along the byway
And more, much more than this, I did it my way

{Extraneous Deleted}

The record shows I took the blows and did it my way
Yes, it was my way

*** end quote ***

“You don’t have to pay tuition for every lesson. You can learn from other people’s mistakes!” — Unknown

# – # – # – # – # 2019-Jan-31 @ 06:59

Please leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: