JOBSEARCH: Don’t be a “source of inconvenient truth”

Surviving (and Thriving) After a Layoff
8 things to know and prepare for–emotionally and professionally
Jan 8th 2015 1:35PM

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I saved this, because I knew it was coming sooner or later.

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1. It is personal. Despite what others may tell you, it really is about you. If you were so essential to the survival of your organization, you wouldn’t have been let go. Accept this as fact and move on.

2. It probably had to do with income. It’s possible that some part of the reason you lost your job is your age, but more than likely it’s because you made more money than your junior colleagues. Employers often figure: Why let go of two lower-paid employees when we can get rid of just a single, senior one? That doesn’t make the loss any sweeter, but it does allow us to keep more of our sense of dignity.

3. Work friendship is fleeting. After you leave the workplace, you’ll miss not only the place and the work (not to mention the steady income and benefits), but also the people. It’s likely that you and your co-workers formed close relationships, especially if you were there for a long time. Be forewarned: often those close relationships are close only through the workplace. You’ll feel ditched by these former friends when they don’t call, write or keep in touch. It happens more often than we like. Two years after my layoff, I still felt hurt when my former friends didn’t reach out or even respond to my calls.

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I think it is MORE than personal.

If you are viewed as a threat to the “establishment” or a more powerful fiefdom, then “downsizing”, “RIF”, or “job elimination” are great excuse to eliminate an “source of inconvenient truth”.

Keep that in mind, and it hurts a little less.

Very little.

If you are, keep your resume updated. And, your eyes clear.

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