RANT: “Death Panel” thinking

Sunday, October 13, 2013

http://www.lewrockwell.com/2013/10/kimberly-paxton/high-school-death-panel%E2%80%A8/

LewRockwell.comanti-state•anti-war•pro-market

Forget Glee Club and Football – This High School Has a Death Panel!
By Kimberly Paxton
The Daily Sheeple
October 12, 2013

*** begin quote ***

Critics of the public school system will be pleased to know that St. Joseph-Ogden High School in Illinois is preparing kids for the future by teaching them practical skills.

That’s right – 15 and 16 year olds just had an assignment on how to distribute limited medical resources amongst a small sampling of the population. They got to pick who deserves to live and who deserves to die.

The lesson involves 10 people who are in desperate need of kidney dialysis.

*** and ***

“The assignment you are referring to is not a “Death Panel” assignment.  The assignment is one in the sociology unit of our Introduction To Social Studies class.  The purpose of the assignment is to educate students about social values and how people in our society unfortunately create biases based off of professions, race, gender, etc.  The teacher’s goal is to educate students in the fact that these social value biases exist, and that hopefully students will see things from a different perspective after the activity is completed.  The teacher’s purpose in the element of the assignment you are referring to is to get students emotionally involved to participate in the classroom discussion, and to open their minds to the fact that they themselves have their own social biases.  The assignment has nothing to do with a “Death Panel.”

*** end quote ***

Sure, surem sure.

Doesn’t look that way to me.

Implicit in the exercise is that the “student” has a moral imperative to make such decisions.

Or that, in fact, such decisions are made in our society.

Having known an older person undergoing dialysis, the free market, that wonder engine of chaotic order, has no such 6/10 shortage. 

It’s a limitation that doesn’t exist in the real world.

A while ago, more than a decade, I saw a brand new HUGE dialysis center by the airport. Far larger than would be needed by the small number of relatively healthy natives. I was curious so I called them talked to the Director. (Astonishingly he answer his own phone that was publicly listed.) He told me that it was built by the community with support from the hotels FOR TOURISTS who needed dialysis while they were on vacation. They accepted Medicare, all insurances, and cash. The “cash rate” was about a third of what my relative paid in NYC. And the fellow was very apologetic that the “cash price” was so high but all the critical supplies had to be airlifted in due to expiration dates.

I was floored.

So, let’s put “WalMart” in charge of everything. (WalMart is my metaphor for a truly free market.)

Argh!

So hospital with only capacity for 6 could put on a second shift for capacity of 12. Now we just have to figure out how to pay for it. How about a “Bake Sale”? Wanna bet if our society can sell naming rights of stadiums, our second shift’s name can be sold. 

I think “Reinke’s Ranters” has a nice ring to it.

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GOLD: Cash is not a “store of value”

Sunday, October 13, 2013

http://news.yahoo.com/ap-impact-families-hoard-cash-5-yrs-crisis-042042926.html

AP IMPACT: Families hoard cash 5 yrs after crisis

Associated Press BERNARD CONDON 3 hours ago

*** begin quote ***

NEW YORK (AP) — Five years after U.S. investment bank Lehman Brothers collapsed, triggering a global financial crisis and shattering confidence worldwide, families in major countries around the world are still hunkered down, too spooked and distrustful to take chances with their money.

An Associated Press analysis of households in the 10 biggest economies shows that families continue to spend cautiously and have pulled hundreds of billions of dollars out of stocks, cut borrowing for the first time in decades and poured money into savings and bonds that offer puny interest payments, often too low to keep up with inflation.

“It doesn’t take very much to destroy confidence, but it takes an awful lot to build it back,” says Ian Bright, senior economist at ING, a global bank based in Amsterdam. “The attitude toward risk is permanently reset.”

A flight to safety on such a global scale is unprecedented since the end of World War II.

The implications are huge: Shunning debt and spending less can be good for one family’s finances. When hundreds of millions do it together, it can starve the global economy.

Weak growth around the world means wages in the United States, which aren’t keeping up with inflation, will continue to rise slowly. Record unemployment in parts of Europe, higher than 35 percent among youth in several countries, won’t fall quickly. Another wave of Chinese, Brazilians and Indians rising into the middle class, as hundreds of millions did during the boom years last decade, is unlikely.

*** end quote ***

“Money is a matter of functions four, a medium, a measure, a standard, a store.” He repeated that four times like poetry. “Six Characters in Money: Portable – Durable – Divisible – Uniformity – Limited Supply – Acceptability.” — CHURCH 10●19●62 (Vol 1) 978-0-557-08387-9 page 110

Sorry, but “cash” isn’t money these days. While it is a “medium of exchange” and “measure”, it fails as a “standard” or “store”.

And maybe if it fails “standard”, it may be failing “measure”.

OK, it does serve as a “medium of exchange”. 

But that’s it.

Note that in disasters and civil unrest, there is no exchange.

And, the TEOTWAWKI (The End Of The World As We Know It) preppers point out you can eat money. But you can make an expensive fire and poor quality toilet paper out of it.

Let’s tackle “standard” next. What is a “dollar”? It’s got no measure. It’s purchasing power decreases year over year due to inflation. An ounce, a gallon, a meter — they don’t change.

Back to “measure”, a 100 is still a 100. But it’s like baseball and football records. How do we measure if every year they change the definition of distance?

And cash is certainly not a “store”. The “rats” are eating the “seed corn” of value.

Argh!

I suggest the preppers’ mantra — beans, bullets, bandaids, and then bullion!

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