POLITICAL: The “(pseudo) War on (some) Drugs” has been officially lost

Sunday, June 16, 2013

http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2013/jun/16/designer-drugs-legal-highs

Why the war on drugs has been made redundant

For every ‘designer drug’ the authorities ban, clandestine labs are churning out a new version. No wonder the law can’t keep up…

Vaughan Bell
The Observer, Saturday 15 June 2013

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When Germany identified the substances and banned them in early 2009, new cannabinoids, again never before seen outside the lab, had replaced them within weeks and this is what has been happening ever since. One gets banned and another novel substance takes its place almost immediately. Professional but clandestine labs are rifling the scientific literature for new psychoactive drugs and synthesising them as fast as the law changes. In one of the most interesting developments, a cannabinoid detected in 2012, named XLR-11, was not only new to the drug market but completely new to science. Several previously unknown substances have turned up since. The grey market labs are not only pushing new substances on to the drug market, they are actually innovating drug design. The human testers select themselves of course, unaware of what they’re taking, sometimes leading to disastrous results. Information about the dangers of new substances is usually nonexistent.

The whole process has also been an unwitting experiment in drug policy. Despite the free availability of substances as pleasurable as already banned drugs, we have not seen a massive increase in problem users and drug mortality rates have been falling. Furthermore, even with the newly introduced “instant bans”, drug laws are simply not able to keep up.

Currently, it is barely possible to detect new drugs at the rate they appear. It has long been clear that the drug war approach of criminalising possession rather than treating problem drug-users has been futile. The revolution in the recreational drug market is a stark reminder of this reality. The war on drugs has not been lost, it has been made obsolete.

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OK, can we now decriminalize “drugs”. 

Let’s recognize reality!

The FDA and Big Pharma are in bed with each other. The underground drug market is how the REAL free market should operate.

Consumers Reports, Underwriters Laboratory, and informed people are our only defense.

Since time immemorial, humans get high. 10% or so become addicts. The percentage varies but that 10% seems to be a floor.

Instead of wasting resources and ruining lives, let’s get back to basic medicine.

Argh!

But politicians and bureaucrats like to use force on victims of addiction because it is PC and their easy to campaign against.

Meanwhile the politicians and bureaucrats are the real problem. And, some of them are criminals.

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POLITICAL: Now that we have a pot head as Prez …

Wednesday, May 30, 2012

http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/politics/2012/05/obama-and-his-pot-smoking-choom-gang/

May 25, 2012 12:54pm
Obama and His Pot-Smoking ‘Choom Gang’

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Unlike Bill Clinton, Barack Obama never tried to say he didn’t inhale.

In his 1995 memoir “Dreams of My Father,” Obama writes about smoking pot almost like Dr. Seuss wrote about eating green eggs and ham. As a high school kid, Obama wrote, he would smoke “in a white classmate’s sparkling new van,” he would smoke “in the dorm room of some brother” and he would smoke “on the beach with a couple of Hawaiian kids.”

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Now that we have a pot head as Prez …

… as a little L libertarian, I’ve always thought that our “drug policy”, “(pseudo) War on (some) Drugs”, was a best “misguided”, at worst “corrupt”. We have too many examples, anecdotal evidence, of pot not being as “bad” as booze, of high achievers who “inhaled” …

Don’t you think we could have a national dialogue about “drugs”, “drug policy”, and factual evidence?

We have mj prohibition because of hemp’s competition with the politically connected paper industry.

We have mj prohibition because of Hollywood’s “reefer madness” propaganda.

We have mj prohibition because of its association with the black community.

We have arguably ¼ of the federal prison population due to mj.

We have sick people, who need it and have no alternative for them. Not an effective alternative. Never mind a cheap alternative.

Ignore that not everyone who has a medical mj RX needs it. There are folks who legitimately need it (i.e., AIDS, chemotherapy patients, glaucoma).

Since the Chinese dynasty, there has been a residual addiction rate. Regardless if addicts were sentenced to death in China. Dealers were imprisoned for long stretches in Southeast Asia. No “public policy” makes a dent in the problem.

If the Gooferment can’t keep “drugs” out of its prisons, then perhaps we need a better strategy?

Walmart and Walgreens seem to be able to restrict access to stuff from minors.

So, why can’t we shift from the “punishment” meme that is immoral, ineffective, and inefficient to a “treatment” meme. 

How much worse could we do?

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POLITICS: The “cost” of the absurd drug war

Thursday, September 11, 2008

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/bob-barr/federal-drug-war-rethough_b_125458.html

Federal Drug War Rethought
Bob Barr
Posted September 10, 2008 | 04:12 PM (EST)

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It is obvious that, like Prohibition’s effort to eradicate alcohol usage, drug prohibition has not succeeded. Despite enormous law enforcement efforts — including the dedicated service of many thousands of professional men and women — the government has not halted drug use. Indeed, the problem is worse today than in 1972, when Richard Nixon first coined the phrase “War on Drugs.”

Whether we like it or not, tens of millions of Americans have used and will continue to use drugs. Yet in 2005 we spent more than $12 billion on federal drug enforcement efforts. Another $30 billion went to incarcerate non-violent drug offenders.

These people must live forever with the scarlet letter P for prison. Only luck saved even presidents and candidates for president from bearing the same mark, which would have disqualified them from not only high political office, but also many more commonplace jobs.

The federal drug laws affect even those who have never smoked (or inhaled!) a marijuana cigarette. One of the lessons I learned while serving in Congress is how power tends to concentrate in Washington, and how that concentration of power begets more power and threatens individual liberty. The ever-expanding drug war is a perfect illustration of this principle.

*** end quote ***

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It saddens me to think of the cost of the gooferment’s quote war on drugs end quote.

I know some Manhattan College students who’s lives were ruined by it. Even back in the Sixties, I knew it was wrong. A killer. My best friend in high school, who flunked out of Manhattan Engineering, dropped out due to the Vietnam Era Draft, and fell into the druggie crowd. Because I my security clearance and the new “war on drugs”, I could not afford to be anywhere around the stuff. So, he and I parted ways. I never saw him again. He was killed on the Beltway in a traffic accident. A casualty of the gooferment’s war. Either the VietNam war or the War on Drugs.

When America get it’s head screwed on straight, we’ll as a nation realize that Prohibition doesn’t work! Period. What peopel put in their own body is their own business. MYOB. And, there ain’t a single thing you or I can do about the decisions that others make. Anything we think will prevent it, like laws, jails, and fines, merely inflict a terrible cost on the unfortunate user who happens to get caught and us. Us, as a society, where we lose our Fourth Amendment rights, where we can’t buy antihistamine wothut a hassle, and where we suffer the collateral damage in gang violence. Just like Al Cappone in the Twenties.

Want to end gang violence? Just have the gooferment walk away from regulation. Ever see a Coke versus Pepsi shoot out? How about Bud and Miller duking it out on the street? Sending vast amounts of money to drug gangs in Mexico, drug kingpins in Columbia, or the terrorists in Afghanistan! We can end that in a heartbeat.

Legalize, deregulate, and wipe out the age restrictions. End all restrictions. And, for good measure allow WalMart to run it.

Will children get drugs? Yes! Do you think that the current system prevents it? Dreamer!

It’s the Libertarian assertion that a free market in drugs will have much less collateral damage than the current insane ‘system’.

42B$ will pay for a lot of things. Drug treatment, education, and giant tax reduction.

Now, what will all the unemployed drug dealers do?

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