PRODUCTIVITY: DROPBOX response; “drugs in prison”

Thursday, September 6, 2012

http://www.readwriteweb.com/enterprise/2012/08/should-your-company-just-say-no-to-dropbox.php

Should Your Company Just Say “No” To Dropbox?
Brian Proffitt

*** Begin Quote ***

As the business world increasingly turns to mobile devices and cloud-based file-sharing services to store or collaborate on important documents, the amount of information that’s falling into the wrong hands keeps climbing.

The numbers tell the tale: 90% of organizations had a leak of sensitive or confidential information over the past year. That’s one of the take-aways from a new study from security analysts at the Ponemon Institute.

Dropbox Is Useful – And That’s The Problem

Services like Dropbox, Bitcasa, YouSendIt and others are useful and efficient ways to get documents and files from one worker to another, especially in this age of mobile devices and distributed workforces. Plus, they’re cheap (or free) and easy for individual workers or small departments to set up.

But increasing use of these tools in the workplace, even for legitimate business reasons such as collaboration, puts a lot of private information at risk. And companies are starting to notice.

How bad is the situation? According to the Ponemon study, 60% of organizations have employees who frequently or very frequently put confidential files on services like Dropbox without permission. And just about that same percentage (59%) reported that what controls they do have in place were ineffective at managing who has access to sensitive files.

*** and ***

Some companies are already reacting with strong policies regulating use of such file-sharing services. IBM, for instance, has banned employee access to services like Dropbox and iCloud. Even the iPhone’s Siri is turned off for fear that sensitive information could be discovered from search query data stored at Apple.

This might be going too far for many companies. Especially if they don’t provide some sort of alternative. IBM has its own custom-built solution for file sharing, but many smaller operations can’t afford such measures.

*** End quote ***

Sure, that’s going to stop the practice.

Every hear of encryption.

Sensitive file? Run it thru PKZIP.

Use LASTPASS to select a 97 character password to encrypt it.

Problem solved.

Argh!

IMHO the rule should be if you can’t able it; you can’t ban it.

Bans don’t work.

Why?

“Drugs in Prison”!

The human being is the world’s best “rat” in terms of adaptability and maze solving.

Tell some one they can’t in an obnoxious enough fashion, and they will spend every waking hour proving you’re wrong.

Enable the behavior in a secure fashion.

Security should never say “no”; they should say “yes, and here’ s how to do it”.

Argh!

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SERVICE: Dropbox two-step authentication

Friday, August 31, 2012

http://lifehacker.com/5937946/dropbox-rolls-out-two+step-verification

Dropbox Adds Two-Step Verification for Enhanced Security, And You Should Turn It On Now [Dropbox]
by David Galloway

*** begin quote ***

Dropbox Adds Two-Step Verification for Enhanced Security, And You Should Turn It On NowMost security-minded computer users know about Google’s two-step verification process, but other popular webapps like Facebook and Amazon have also added this great way of reducing your chances of being hacked. Today, Dropbox joins the two-step verification party .

To enable Dropbox two-step authentication you’ll need to allow Dropbox to send you a text message with a code or use a mobile authenticator app if you don’t want Dropbox to have your phone number. Either way works fine and enables the “something you have” plus “something you know” steps to help keep you safe.

To get started go to your account settings page on Dropbox, click on the Security tab, and scroll down to the bottom of the page and enable two-step verification. Or just click this link.

*** end quote ***

GREAT!

We need two factor on more critical inet services.

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SERVICE: Anther horror story of an old computer failing

Monday, February 20, 2012

On Saturday, I visited an old Jasper in the hospital. He was in for an emergency tune up. Hope he’s out by now. But, to the point, he was telling me his troubles with an unbacked up old Windoze box that was giving him fits. And, his family’s designated stuckee for tech support. Last time, he went through this, I pitched Mozy, Carbonite, or Pogoplug. Reprised that song.

On Sunday, I heard from a relative who’s old unbacked up Windoze box was circling the proverbial bowl. (Seems like “unbacked up” goes with “old Windoze box”.) Reprise my backup song.

Now I realize I’m crazed about it. Two belts and two suspenders.

My photos are on three live boxes, sugarsynced, carbonited, and pogopluged.

My data is on two live boxes, dropboxed, carbonited, and pogopluged.

Special projects are on one, two, or three live boxes, dropboxed, carbonited, and pogopluged. AND, boxneted.

I’ve lost work to Microsoft’s crappy solutions before.

Sure it’s messy, but if I lose something because I fat finger something, there’s always several places to recover from.

Argh!

It’s only common sense.

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TECHNOLOGY: KODAK may go Chapter 11; are your pictures backed up

Sunday, January 8, 2012

On Fri, Jan 6, 2012 at 10:57 AM, X wrote:

http://www.cnn.com/2011/12/27/tech/mobile/dropbox-camera-auto-import/index.html?c=mobile

Sent from my iPhone 

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Nah, it’ll just blow out storing pictures. Now if KODAK offered it, I’d be interested.

BTW the impending KODAK chapter 11 has led me to back up all my pictures into SUGARSYNC and I ordered and have an EOY cd.

Can’t depend upon any ONE service provider.

Argh!

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Word to the wise: Cloud services are useful, BUT, (and there is always a BIG butt), always worry that they could disappear tomorrow.

Argh!

Remember the Rawles adage: “Two is one; one is none”. Service providers or survival tools, same rules apply!

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