PRODUCTIVITY: Track your vacinations?

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

http://www.survivalblog.com/2011/08/tetanus_a_nasty_fascinating_bu.html

Tetanus: A Nasty, Fascinating Bug, by Dr. Bob

By James Wesley, Rawles on August 15, 2011 12:25 AM

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Nearly everyone has heard of the famous “lockjaw”, but not everyone knows that the cause is tetanus infection. Even fewer people have actually seen a case of tetanus, even in the medical circles it is a rare event in the U.S. There are only 233 cases reported from 2001 to 2008–or 1/10,000,000. Deaths are even more rare here in the States, and of those 233, 31 were fatalities. Most deaths were people over 65, presumed to be less than optimally immunized.

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Don’t go the way of blues musician Joe Hill Louis, Henry David Thoreau’s brother, and Robert E. Lee’s favorite horse Traveller–all dying of tetanus. Keep up with your vaccinations and get your kids vaccinated too against tetanus. Kids start at two months of age getting a Tdap shot, don’t miss this chance to protect your child.

Stay strong and stay vaccinated against tetanus.

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Does anyone even keep track of their vaccinations?

www.nfid.org/pdf/influenza/adultizcard.pdf

Put your card with your passport?

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PRODUCTIVITY: Vague? Accuracy and precision

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

http://lifehacker.com/5829224/how-embracing-vagueness-can-help-you-achieve-your-goals

How Embracing Vagueness Can Help You Achieve Your Goals

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We live in a world or precision where data-generating technology is available for practically aspect of your life. We’re also bombarded by tools to help us plan everything down to the smallest detail. But without uncertainty you’re stuck in a place where you always think you know the answer, and this can be a major encumbrance when you’re trying to get things done.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/False_precision

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False precision (also called overprecision, fake precision, misplaced precision and spurious accuracy) occurs when numerical data are presented in a manner that implies better precision than is actually the case; since precision is a limit to accuracy, this often leads to overconfidence in the accuracy as well.[1]

In science and engineering, convention dictates that unless a margin of error is explicitly stated, the number of significant figures used in the presentation of data should be limited to what is warranted by the precision of those data. For example, if an instrument can be read to an accuracy of tenths of a unit of measurement, results of calculations using data obtained from that instrument can only be confidently stated to the tenths place, regardless of what the raw calculation returns or whether other data used in the calculation are more accurate. Even outside these disciplines, there is a tendency to assume that all the non-zero digits of a number are meaningful; thus, providing excessive figures may lead the viewer to expect better precision than actually exists.

However, in contrast, it is good practice to retain more significant figures than this in the intermediate stages of a calculation, in order to avoid accumulated rounding errors.

False precision commonly arises when high-precision and low-precision data are combined, and in conversion of units.

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I can remember a wise old Christian Brother in injineering skrule saying: “Gentlemen, … <he always used it perjoratively> … you will make blunders, mistakes, and errors, but a sure way to get an F in injineering measurements is to tell me that anything that is ⅓ is .333333333333333.” False precision in injineering is like goal and objectives that aren’t vague enough to stretch.

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SOFTWARE: My first FORTRAN primer was his

Tuesday, August 16, 2011

http://www.readwriteweb.com/hack/2011/08/some-thoughts-on-the-passing-o.php

Some Thoughts on the Passing of Dan McCracken (1930 – 2011)
By Scott M. Fulton, III / August 15, 2011 2:03 PM / 0 Comments

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What Daniel D. McCracken managed to accomplish as early as 1957 was to give a knowledgeable layperson a strong, sensible foundation for understanding the terribly foreign concept of describing business processes with procedural mathematics. As a young author decades ago, I studied McCracken’s methods and I attempted to take his lessons to heart. In some of my first books on Visual Basic, I was inspired by McCracken to demonstrate a relatively simple concept using a substantively more complex tool: I demonstrated program control using sort algorithms.

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Sadly, I never knew the fellow, but he’s responsible for me knowing anything about FORTRAN.

As the typical fat old white guy injineer nerd I could make that language sing. All do to him.

For better or worse.

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